Monday, August 29, 2016

One of America's Favorites - Fried Eggs

A fried egg is a cooked dish commonly made using a fresh hen's egg, fried whole with minimal
Fried eggs 
accompaniment. Fried eggs are traditionally eaten for breakfast in English-speaking countries but may also be served at other times of the day.

Americans use many different terms to describe fried eggs, including:

* Over easy or over light
Cooked on both sides; the yolk is runny and the egg white is fully cooked. Eggs fried over easy are also commonly referred to as dippy eggs or dip eggs by Marylanders, by Pennsylvania Dutch people living in central Pennsylvania, by those living around them as well as in parts of Ohio, mainly due to the practice of dipping toast into the yolk while eating. This term is also occasionally used in Canada.
* Over medium
Cooked on both sides; the yolk is cooked through but soft and near liquid at the center. The egg white is thoroughly cooked.
* Over hard
Cooked on both sides with the yolk broken, until set or hard.
* Over well
Cooked on both sides with the yolk fully cooked through and hard. Similar to a hard-boiled egg.
* Sunny side up
Cooked on one side only, until the egg white is set, but the yolk remains liquid. This is often known
Ham served with fried eggs prepared sunny side up
simply as eggs up. Gently splashing the hot cooking oil or fat over the sunny side uncooked white (i.e., basting) may be done to thoroughly cook the white. Covering the frying pan with a lid during cooking (optionally adding a cover and half-teaspoon of water just before finishing) allows for a less "runny" egg, and is an alternative method to flipping for cooking an egg over easy (this is occasionally called sunny side down or basted).

Egg in the basket

This American dish is usually made by cutting a circle or other shape out of a slice of bread, often
Eggs in the basket
using a drinking glass or biscuit cutter. The bread is fried until brown on one side and then flipped, and an egg is broken into the center and seasoned, usually with salt and pepper, and sometimes herbs. The pan is then covered, and the egg is cooked until the white is just set. The cutout center of the bread is often fried as well, and served alongside or on top of the finished egg.

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