Monday, September 30, 2013

Fried Okeechobee Crappie w/ Hash Browns and Collard Greens

Dinner Tonight: Fried Okeechobee Crappie w/ Hash Browns and Collard Greens



A dreary and cloudy day out today. Had to run my parents to Cincinnati for my Dad to get a new portable Fairfield, you can read about both in two earlier posts. For dinner tonight, Fried Okeechobee Crappie w/  Hash Browns and Collard Greens.
breather. He's had a home oxygen for a while now but he's going to have to keep a portable air with him when he's out. A lot going on locally with Operation Pumpkin in Hamilton and Jungle Jim's Ring of Fire Weekend in






 It's always a sad day when I use my last bags of the Lake Okeechobee Crappie, or as the locals there call them "Specks". My cousin always brings me a batch when they go down for the winter at Lake Okeechobee, Florida. I try to make them last as long as I can but the time has come to break that last bag out of the freezer. I love all fish but these are my favorite fresh water fish by far! Love the taste and just how they fry up so good and brown. I laid the last bag out last night to thaw in the fridge. I rinsed the fillets off in cold water and patted dry with a paper towel. I then seasoned them a bit of Sea Salt and then rolled them in Zatarain’s Crispy Southern Fish Fri Breading Mix. Pan fried them in Canola Oil about 3 minutes per side. As usual with Crappie they came out Golden Brown and delicious!





For side dishes I prepared  Hash Browns and Collard Greens. I used Simply Potatoes Hash Browns, my favorite Potato side dishes. Fried in Canola Oil and seasoned them with Sea Salt, Ground Pepper, and Parsley. Also, for the first time, I prepared Collard Greens. They were canned and Walmart Store Brand. Just heated them in a small sauce pan on medium high for 5 minutes, drained, and season with Sea Salt. I think I had Collard Greens 1 other time. They came out very good, a good change of pace for a side dish! For dessert later tonight a bowl of Del Monte No Sugar Added Peach Chunks.





Zatarain's Crispy Southern Fish Fri
The secret of authentic Southern style fried fish is the crispy combination of cornmeal, corn flour, spices and lemon juice captured in this special Zatarain's Frying Mix.

Amount Per Serving % Daily Value
Calories: 60

Calories from Fat: 0

Total Fat: 0g 0%

Saturated Fat: 0g 0%

Cholesterol: 0mg 0%

Sodium: 630mg 26%

Total Carb: 12g 4%

Dietary Fiber: 0 0%

Sugar: 0g

Protein: 1g

Vitamin A: 2%


http://www.zatarains.com/Products/Breadings-and-Fry-Mixes/Crispy-Southern-Fish-Fri.aspx

"Operation Pumpkin 2013! Oct. 4, 5 & 6" Historic Downtown Hamilton, OH.

"Operation Pumpkin 2013! Oct. 4, 5 & 6"  Historic Downtown Hamilton, OH.

Fri-Sat 11am-10pm & Sun 11am-5pm In Historic Downtown Hamilton, OH.





Festivalgoers of all ages are gearing up for Operation Pumpkin 2013, a pumpkin and art festival, which will be held in downtown Hamilton on October 4-6. This free, family-friendly event is expected to draw more than 40,000 attendees. Hours are next Friday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; next Saturday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; and next Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
According to organizer Jason Snyder, the second-year event has added more vendors, events and attractions for 2013. There are more than 140 vendors slated to participate, with a maximum capacity of about 165 vendors.



Events this year include:
Sanctioned Giant Pumpkin Weigh-Off hosted by the SOGPG
Vintage Hamilton Wine Tasting hosted by the Ohio Wine Producers
Double Dam Regatta hosted by the Great Miami Rowing Center
Giant Pumpkin Regatta on the Great Miami River
Live Local Entertainment
Local Artisans
Delicious Cuisine
Pet Parade
Amusement Rides
Duck Race
Hamilton School’s Decorated Pumpkin Display
and more!


http://operation-pumpkin.org/

One of America's Favorites - Breakfast

Western breakfast foods


Breakfast is the first meal taken after rising from a night's sleep, most often eaten in the early morning before undertaking the day's work. Among English speakers, "breakfast" can be used to refer to this meal or to refer to a meal composed of traditional breakfast foods (such as eggs, oatmeal and sausage) served at any time of day. The word literally refers to breaking the fasting period of the prior night.

Breakfast foods vary widely from place to place, but often include a carbohydrate such as grains or cereals, fruit and/or vegetables, a protein food such as eggs, meat or fish, and a beverage such as tea, coffee, milk or fruit juice. Coffee, milk, tea, juice, breakfast cereals, pancakes, sausages, French toast, bacon, sweet breads, fresh fruit, vegetables, eggs, mushrooms, baked beans, muffins, crumpets and toast with butter or margarine and/or jam or marmalade are common examples of breakfast foods, though a large range of preparations and ingredients are associated with breakfast globally.

Nutritional experts have referred to breakfast as the most important meal of the day, citing studies that find that people who skip breakfast are disproportionately likely to have problems with concentration, metabolism, weight, and cardiac health. The nutritionist Monica Reinagel has argued the metabolic benefits have been exaggerated, noting the improvement in cognition has been found among children, but is much less significant among adults. Reinagel also explains that the link between skipping breakfast and increased weight is likely behavioral—compensating with snacks and/or eating more later—and therefore not inevitable.



An example of a country breakfast in U.S. 


Breakfast will often consist of either a cereal-based dish or an egg-based dish. Coffee is the most common breakfast beverage amongst adults, but is not popular with children. Tea is also widely consumed in Canada during breakfast. Orange juice and, to a lesser extent, pineapple or apple juice, are consumed by people of all ages. In the United States, 65% of coffee is drunk during breakfast hours.

The way in which breakfast eggs are prepared ranges from the simple, such as scrambled or fried, to the slightly more complex, such as eggs benedict. Breakfast omelettes are also very popular, especially the Western or Denver omelette, which contains ham, peppers, and onions. Steak is a popular accompaniment to eggs outside of the northeast, where it is relatively rare. Bacon, hash browns, toast, and sausage links are all very commonly served alongside eggs.

Grain-based dishes include waffles, pancakes, French toast, crepes in Canada, and cereal with milk. Porridge, such as Red River Cereal is quite popular in Canada, and may be consumed with maple syrup, nuts, dried fruit, or brown sugar.

In both Canada and the United States, the traditional full breakfast is popular, though is more commonly eaten on weekends and holidays. During the week, a smaller breakfast is commonly eaten, often immediately before or while commuting to work or school.

In Canada, and somewhat less commonly the United States, maple syrup may be served with most breakfast dishes including oatmeal, French toast, waffles, pancakes, and even ham.
In the Southeastern United States, grits are popularly eaten at breakfast.
Foods typically considered to be breakfast foods are often available all day at diners, leading to them being consumed at novel times, which is likely responsible for the term "breakfast for dinner" or "brinner."






Fall Harvest: Cranberries

Cranberries, native to North America, and are harvested in New England and the Upper Midwest in the fall.


Cranberry bush with fruit partially submerged



Cranberries are a group of evergreen dwarf shrubs or trailing vines in the subgenus Oxycoccus of the genus Vaccinium. In some methods of classification, Oxycoccus is regarded as a genus in its own right. They can be found in acidic bogs throughout the cooler regions of the northern hemisphere.
Cranberries are low, creeping shrubs or vines up to 2 metres (7 ft) long and 5 to 20 centimetres (2 to 8 in) in height; they have slender, wiry stems that are not thickly woody and have small evergreen leaves. The flowers are dark pink, with very distinct reflexed petals, leaving the style and stamens fully exposed and pointing forward. They are pollinated by bees. The fruit is a berry that is larger than the leaves of the plant; it is initially white, but turns a deep red when fully ripe. It is edible, with an acidic taste that can overwhelm its sweetness.
Cranberries are a major commercial crop in certain American states and Canadian provinces (see cultivation and uses below). Most cranberries are processed into products such as juice, sauce, jam, and sweetened dried cranberries, with the remainder sold fresh to consumers. Cranberry sauce is regarded as an indispensable part of traditional American and Canadian Thanksgiving menus and some European winter festivals.
Since the early 21st century within the global functional food industry, raw cranberries have been marketed as a "superfruit" due to their nutrient content and antioxidant qualities.





There are three to four species of cranberry, classified in two sections:
Subgenus Oxycoccus, sect. Oxycoccus
8 Vaccinium oxycoccos or Oxycoccus palustris (Common Cranberry or Northern Cranberry) is widespread throughout the cool temperate northern hemisphere, including northern Europe, northern Asia and northern North America. It has small 5–10 mm leaves. The flowers are dark pink, with a purple central spike, produced on finely hairy stems. The fruit is a small pale pink berry, with a refreshing sharp acidic flavour.
* Vaccinium microcarpum or Oxycoccus microcarpus (Small Cranberry) occurs in northern North America, northern Europe and northern Asia, and differs from V. oxycoccos in the leaves being more triangular, and the flower stems hairless. Some botanists include it within V. oxycoccos.
* Vaccinium macrocarpon or Oxycoccus macrocarpus (Large cranberry, American Cranberry, Bearberry) native to northern North America across Canada, and eastern United States, south to North Carolina at high altitudes). It differs from V. oxycoccos in the leaves being larger, 10–20 mm long, and in its slightly apple-like taste.
Subgenus Oxycoccus, sect. Oxycoccoides
* Vaccinium erythrocarpum or Oxycoccus erythrocarpus (Southern Mountain Cranberry) native to southeastern North America at high altitudes in the southern Appalachian Mountains, and also in eastern Asia.

Cranberries

Cranberries are related to bilberries, blueberries, and huckleberries, all in Vaccinium subgenus Vaccinium. These differ in having stouter, woodier stems forming taller shrubs, and in the bell-shaped flowers, the petals not being reflexed.
Some plants of the completely unrelated genus Viburnum are sometimes inaccurately called "highbush cranberries" (Viburnum trilobum).
Cranberries are susceptible to false blossom, a harmful but controllable phytoplasma disease common in the eastern production areas of Massachusetts and New Jersey.





Cranberries are a major commercial crop in the U.S. states of Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, Washington, and Wisconsin, as well as in the Canadian provinces of British Columbia, New Brunswick, Ontario, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Quebec. 20% of the world's cranberries are produced in British Columbia's lower mainland region. In the United States, Wisconsin is the leading producer of cranberries, with over half of U.S. production. Massachusetts is the second largest U.S. producer. A very small production is found in southern Argentina and Chile, the Netherlands, and Eastern Europe.[citation needed]
Historically, cranberry beds were constructed in wetlands. Today cranberry beds are constructed in upland areas with a shallow water table. The topsoil is scraped off to form dykes around the bed perimeter. Clean sand is hauled into a depth of four to eight inches. The surface is laser leveled flat to provide even drainage. Beds are frequently drained with socked tile in addition to the perimeter ditch. In addition to making it possible to hold water, the dykes allow equipment to service the beds without driving on the vines. Irrigation equipment is installed in the bed to provide irrigation for vine growth and for spring and autumn frost protection.





Cranberry vines are propagated by moving vines from an established bed. The vines are spread on the surface of the sand of the new bed and pushed into the sand with a blunt disk. The vines are watered frequently during the first few weeks until roots form and new shoots grow. Beds are given frequent light application of nitrogen fertilizer during the first year. The cost of establishment for new cranberry beds is estimated to be about US$70,000 per hectare (approx. $28,300 per acre).
A common misconception about cranberry production is that the beds remain flooded throughout the year. During the growing season cranberry beds are not flooded, but are irrigated regularly to maintain soil moisture. Beds are flooded in the autumn to facilitate harvest and again during the winter to protect against low temperatures. In cold climates like Wisconsin, Maine, and eastern Canada, the winter flood typically freezes into ice, while in warmer climates the water remains liquid. When ice forms on the beds, trucks can be driven onto the ice to spread a thin layer of sand that helps to control pests and rejuvenate the vines. Sanding is done every three to five years.



Cranberry harvest in New Jersey


Cranberries are harvested in the fall when the fruit takes on its distinctive deep red color. This is usually in September through the first part of November. To harvest cranberries, the beds are flooded with six to eight inches of water above the vines. A harvester is driven through the beds to remove the fruit from the vines. For the past 50 years, water reel type harvesters have been used. Harvested cranberries float in the water and can be corralled into a corner of the bed and conveyed or pumped from the bed. From the farm, cranberries are taken to receiving stations where they are cleaned, sorted, and stored prior to packaging or processing.
Although most cranberries are wet-picked as described above, 5–10% of the US crop is still dry-picked. This entails higher labor costs and lower yield, but dry-picked berries are less bruised and can be sold as fresh fruit instead of having to be immediately frozen or processed. Originally performed with two-handed comb scoops, dry picking is today accomplished by motorized, walk-behind harvesters which must be small enough to traverse beds without damaging the vines.
White cranberry juice is made from regular cranberries that have been harvested after the fruits are mature, but before they have attained their characteristic dark red color. Yields are lower on beds harvested early and the early flooding tends to damage vines, but not severely.
Cranberries for fresh market are stored in shallow bins or boxes with perforated or slatted bottoms, which deter decay by allowing air to circulate. Because harvest occurs in late autumn, cranberries for fresh market are frequently stored in thick walled barns without mechanical refrigeration. Temperatures are regulated by opening and closing vents in the barn as needed. Cranberries destined for processing are usually frozen in bulk containers shortly after arriving at a receiving station.





About 95% of cranberries are processed into products such as juice drinks, sauce, and sweetened dried cranberries. The remaining are sold fresh to consumers.
Cranberries are normally considered too sharp to be eaten plain and raw, as they are not only sour but bitter as well.
Cranberry juice is a major use of cranberries; it is usually either sweetened to make "cranberry juice cocktail" or blended with other fruit juices to reduce its natural severe tartness. Many cocktails, including the Cosmopolitan, are made with cranberry juice. At one teaspoon of sugar per ounce, cranberry juice cocktail is more highly sweetened than even soda drinks that have been linked to obesity.
Usually cranberries as fruit are cooked into a compote or jelly, known as cranberry sauce. Such preparations are traditionally served with roast turkey, as a staple of English Christmas dinners, and the Canadian and US holiday Thanksgiving. The berry is also used in baking (muffins, scones, cakes and breads). In baking it is often combined with orange or orange zest. Less commonly, innovative cooks use cranberries to add tartness to savory dishes such as soups and stews.
Fresh cranberries can be frozen at home, and will keep up to nine months; they can be used directly in recipes without thawing.
Cranberry wine is made in some of the cranberry-growing regions of the United States and Canada from either whole cranberries, cranberry juice or cranberry juice concentrate.





Kitchen Hint of the Day!

A wonderful and - dare we say it? - fun way to make your fruits and veggies last longer is to try home canning. You may think canning is just for country folk, but it's becoming more and more popular as a way to save money and make sure you're eating foods with the least amount of preservatives possible. Buy foods when they are in season, or better yet, grow your own and can to save later. The biggest trick in canning is to make sure that no air (which contains bacteria) gets into your jars; this is achieved with a pressure canner or boiling - water canner. Find out what these contraptions are and how safely fruit, vegetables, pickles, meat, poultry, seafood, salsas, pie filling, jams, and more from the USDA's extensive free Guide to Home Canning, available at: http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/publications_usda.html.

Sunday, September 29, 2013

Black Bean and Turkey Tacos

Dinner Tonight: Black Bean and Turkey Tacos





Rainy day around here today. We needed some rain though it was getting a little dry around here. Not much going on, just bummed around doing odds and ends till football started up in the afternoon. For dinner I prepared Black Bean and Turkey Tacos.





I used Jennie - O Extra Lean Ground Turkey Breast, I had this leftover from the other night when I made Stuffed Peppers. I fried it in Canola Oil and seasoned it with Sea Salt, Ground Roasted Cumin, Cilantro Flakes, and 1 package of Old El Paso Low Sodium Taco Seasoning. As I added the Taco Seasoning Mix I also added 1 can of Bush’s Low Sodium Black Beans, I drained and rinsed them before I added them. Black Beans with Ground Turkey is a perfect pairing for Tacos. Mixed well until everything was coated and then simmered another 5 minutes until heated through.





For my other toppings I used 1 small can of Mario Sliced Black Olives, 1 small diced Tomato, Sargento 4 Cheese Mexican Shredded Reduced Fat Cheese, Dole Shredded Lettuce, Old El Paso Taco Sauce, and all in a Ortega Whole Grain Corn Taco Shells. I love these Tacos! The crunch of the shells and all the different flavors and spices make a perfect Taco. For dessert later a Jello Sugarless Double Chocolate Pudding.







Ortega Whole Grain Corn Taco Shells



Excellent Source of Fiber and 16 grams of Whole Grains per serving. Each package contains 10 Taco Shells, total net weight of 4.9 oz.

Product Detail
Ortega Whole Grain Taco Shells are rich with flavor and texture and offer the fiber and complex carbohydrates your body needs. Our unique recipe combines whole kernel corn with whole grains for a delicious way to nourish and satisfy your body and the entire family. Plus, only Ortega Taco Shells are carefully placed in a proprietary freshness pack to cushion and protect them from breaking. Each freshness pack is then vacuum sealed to keep the shells fresh and crisp. Taste the Difference!

Ingredients
Whole Yellow Kernal Corn, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Maltodextrin, Corn Bran, Water, Salt, Hydrated Lime.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 2 shells

Amount Per Serving
Calories from Fat 50Calories 110

% Daily Values*
Total Fat 6g 9%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Polyunsaturated Fat 2.5g
Monounsaturated Fat 1g
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 0mg 0%
Sodium 160mg 7%
Total Carbohydrate 17g 6%
Dietary Fiber 5g 20%
Sugars 0g
Protein 2g



http://www.ortega.com/products/ortega-whole-grain-taco-shells-10ct_17103

How to Survive (and Thrive) at a Potluck

Tailgating and gathering at a friends house for a day of Football is great but can be difficult if you have Diabetes. Well here's some tips on How to Survive (and Thrive) at a Potluck. It's all from the Diabetic Living On Line web site and I left the link at the bottom of the post.




Make & Take Tips!
For people with diabetes, potlucks can be a trove of temptation. Our potluck survival guide and recipes for healthy casseroles will help you stick to a guilt-free eating plan!



How to Survive (and Thrive) at a Potluck
Potluck buffet spreads can be loaded with temptations, but with the right approach, you can serve up some healthful choices and not feel deprived. Find simple tips and tricks to enjoy your next potluck without blowing your diabetes meal plan.



The Dish You Take
Smart potluck decisions start at home: Figure out a dish you can take that guarantees at least one healthful option. Then plan how other foods can fit on your plate.

Contributing foods that suit your meal plan lets you assume control over your potluck choices. Grilled veggies -- served hot or cold -- add nutritious variety to the table. Vegetable skewers with zucchini, summer squash, mushrooms, and peppers are easy to pick up -- and with cubes of lean meat, they make an entree. Even casseroles can be healthy options if you pick diabetes-friendly recipes.

Remember salads, too, such as coleslaw, potato salad, or macaroni salad made healthy with generous amounts of colorful chopped vegetables and low-fat mayonnaise or plain low-fat yogurt.

For a sandwich buffet, think about whole wheat pita pocket halves. You can serve them with stuff-it-yourself fillings such as lean meats, tuna (not tuna salad), reduced-fat cheese, tomato, and spinach.....




* Get all the tips on How to Survive (and Thrive) at a Potluck by clicking the link below.


http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/food-to-eat/dining-out/how-to-survive-and-thrive-potluck/?sssdmh=dm17.693579&esrc=nwdlo092413

Fall Harvest: Chard

Red chard growing at Slow Food Nation


Chard like all cooking greens, chard turns bitter when it gets too hot. Chard grows year-round in temperate areas, is best harvested in late summer or early fall in colder areas, and fall through spring in warmer regions.



Chard (Beta vulgaris subsp. cicla), is a leafy green vegetable often used in Mediterranean cooking. The leaves can be green or reddish in color like Bib Lettuce, chard stalks also vary in color. Chard has been bred to have highly nutritious leaves at the expense of the root (which is not as nutritious as the leaves). Chard is considered to be one of the healthiest vegetables available, and is a valuable addition to a healthy diet (like other green leafy vegetables). Chard has been around for centuries, but because of its similarity to beets it is difficult to determine the exact evolution of the different varieties of chard.





Clusters of chard seeds are usually sown between April and August, depending on the desired harvesting period. Chard can be harvested while the leaves are young and tender, or after maturity when they are larger and have slightly tougher stems. Harvesting is a continuous process, as most species of chard produce three or more crops.[10] Raw chard is extremely perishable.



Swiss chard on sale at an outdoor market


Cultivars of chard include green forms, such as 'Lucullus' and 'Fordhook Giant', as well as red-ribbed forms such as 'Ruby Chard' and 'Rhubarb Chard'. The red-ribbed forms are very attractive in the garden, but as a rough general rule, the older green forms will tend to out-produce the colorful hybrids. 'Rainbow Chard' is a mix of other colored varieties that is often mistaken for a variety unto itself.
Chard has shiny, green, ribbed leaves, with petioles that range from white to yellow to red, depending on the cultivar.
Chard is a spring harvest plant. In the Northern Hemisphere, chard is typically ready to harvest as early as April and lasts through May. Chard is one of the more hardy leafy greens, with a harvest season typically lasting longer than kale, spinach or baby greens. When day-time temperatures start to regularly hit 30 °C (86 °F), the harvest season is coming to an end.





Chard has a slightly bitter taste and is used in a variety of cultures around the world, including Arab cuisine.
Fresh young chard can be used raw in salads. Mature chard leaves and stalks are typically cooked (like in pizzoccheri) or sauteed; their bitterness fades with cooking, leaving a refined flavor which is more delicate than that of cooked spinach.





Swiss chard is high in vitamins A, K and C, with a 175 g serving containing 214%, 716%, and 53%, respectively, of the recommended daily value. It is also rich in minerals, dietary fiber and protein.
All parts of the chard plant contain oxalic acid.





Kitchen Hint of the Day!


Don't spend money on store bought bread crumbs. Set aside a special jar and pour crumbs from the bottom of cracker or low sugar cereal boxes. Also add crumbs from leftover garlic bread and a few dried herbs, and soon you'll have seasoned bread crumbs! The great thing is that homemade bread crumbs are even better than store bought, since their uneven texture helps make them stick.

Saturday, September 28, 2013

Bison Sirloin and Sauteed Mushrooms w/ Diced New Potatoes, Cut Green Beans, ....

Dinner Tonight: Bison Sirloin and Sauteed Mushrooms w/ Diced New Potatoes, Cut Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread





Sort of a long day today, I was dealing with those dreaded Phantom Pains again today! When these start up till the time they end I'm pretty much in shutdown mode. It's always amazing how painful these are without the aching part, in my case left leg, being these. They have finally started to ease up towards the early evening. For dinner tonight I prepared a Bison Sirloin and Sauteed Mushrooms w/ Diced New Potatoes, Cut Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread.





I was out of the Wild Idea Buffalo Steaks so I went with Great Range Bison Sirloin. Great range is a very good Bison Meat supplier and the only one that sold here locally, Kroger sells the Sirloins and Ground Bison Products. Their not quite the sweet and wild flavor as Wild Idea Buffalo but still a very good one. I seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn. I pan fried it in Canola Oil, about 4 1/2 minutes per side. I cooked it a tad longer than normal Bison, these were a bit thicker cut. It came out just as I like them, nice sear on the outside and a nice pink center on the inside. Served it with Sauteed Mushrooms.





The sides were complements of Del Monte again! I had Del Monte Diced New Potatoes along with Del Monte Reduced Sodium Cut Green Beans. I love Baked Potatoes but for the past month or so the Russet Baking Potatoes around here haven't been very good. Bad year for Potatoes maybe? For dessert later a bowl of Breyer's Carb Smart Vanilla Ice Cream topped with Smucker's Sugarless Hot Fudge Topping, good stuff!






Great Range Brand Bison

About Great Range Brand Bison
and Rocky Mountain Natural Meats

Great Range Brand Bison is produced and distributed by Rocky Mountain Natural Meats. Rocky Mountain Natural Meats started in 1986 as a small meat distributor devoted solely to bison. From the beginning, our focus was to provide high quality bison meat and great service to grocers, distributors and restaurants nationwide. An in-house grading system was developed to guarantee premium quality and consistency to the end user – this became the Great Range Bison brand. Carcass characteristics such as fat color, fat cover, muscle color, ossification and weight are the major factors in determining if the product receives the Great Range Bison brand. By working closely with our producers and assisting them with ration formulation, our quality control begins at the source. Today, Rocky Mountain Natural Meats processes over 400 head of bison per week.



http://www.greatrangebison.com/index.html

Fall Harvest: Celery

Celery is at its best in the fall, with its harvest continuing through winter in warm and temperate climates.



Head of celery, sold as a vegetable. Usually only the stalks are eaten.


Celery (Apium graveolens var. dulce) is a plant variety in the family Apiaceae, commonly used as a vegetable. The plant grows to 1 m tall. The leaves are pinnate to bipinnate leaves with rhombic leaflets 3–6 cm long and 2–4 cm broad. The flowers are creamy-white, 2–3 mm diameter, produced in dense compound umbels. The seeds are broad ovoid to globose, 1.5–2 mm long and wide.





In North America, commercial production of celery is dominated by the varieties called Pascal celery. Gardeners can grow a range of cultivars, many of which differ little from the wild species, mainly in having stouter leaf stems. They are ranged under two classes, white and red; the white cultivars being generally the best flavoured, and the most crisp and tender. The stalks grow in tight, straight, parallel bunches, and are typically marketed fresh that way, without roots and just a little green leaf remaining.
In Europe the dominant variety of celery most commonly available in trade is Celeriac (Apium graveolens var. rapaceum) grown for its hypocotyl forming a large bulb (commonly but incorrectly called celery root). The leaves are used as seasoning, and the stalks find only marginal use.
The wild form of celery is known as "smallage". It has a furrowed stalk with wedge-shaped leaves, the whole plant having a coarse, earthy taste, and a distinctive smell. The stalks are not usually eaten (except in soups or stews in French cuisine), but the leaves may be used in salads, and its seeds are those sold as a spice. With cultivation and blanching, the stalks lose their acidic qualities and assume the mild, sweetish, aromatic taste particular to celery as a salad plant.
The plants are raised from seed, sown either in a hot bed or in the open garden according to the season of the year, and after one or two thinnings and transplantings, they are, on attaining a height of 15–20 cm, planted out in deep trenches for convenience of blanching, which is effected by earthing up to exclude light from the stems.
In the past, celery was grown as a vegetable for winter and early spring; it was perceived as a cleansing tonic, welcomed to counter the salt-sickness of a winter diet. By the 19th century, the season for celery had been extended, to last from the beginning of September to late in April.





Harvesting occurs when the average size of celery in a field is marketable; due to extremely uniform crop growth, fields are harvested only once. The petioles and leaves are removed and harvested; celery is packed by size and quality (determined by color, shape, straightness and thickness of petiole, stalk and midrib[clarification needed] length and absence of disease, cracks, splits, insect damage and rot). Under optimal conditions, celery can be stored for up to seven weeks between 0 to 2 °C (32 to 36 °F). Inner stalks may continue growing if kept at temperatures above 0 °C (32 °F). Freshly cut petioles of celery are prone to decay, which can be prevented or reduced through the use of sharp blades during processing, gentle handling, and proper sanitation.
In the past, restaurants used to store it in a container of water with powdered vegetable preservative; however, the sulfites in the preservative caused allergic reactions in some people. In 1986, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration banned the use of sulfites on fruits and vegetables intended to be eaten raw.





Celery is used around the world as a vegetable for the crisp petiole (leaf stalk). The leaves are strongly flavoured and are used less often, either as a flavouring in soups and stews or as a dried herb.
In temperate countries, celery is also grown for its seeds. Actually very small fruit, these "seeds" yield a valuable volatile oil used in the perfume and pharmaceutical industries. They also contain an organic compound called apiol. Celery seeds can be used as flavouring or spice, either as whole seeds or ground and mixed with salt, as celery salt. Celery salt can also be made from an extract of the roots, or using dried leaves. Celery salt is used as a seasoning, in cocktails (notably to enhance the flavor of Bloody Mary cocktails), on the Chicago-style hot dog, and in Old Bay Seasoning.
Celery, onions, and bell peppers are the "holy trinity" of Louisiana Creole and Cajun cuisine. Celery, onions, and carrots make up the French mirepoix, often used as a base for sauces and soups. Celery is a staple in many soups, such as chicken noodle soup.





The use of celery seed in pills for relieving pain was described by Aulus Cornelius Celsus around AD 30. Celery seeds contain a compound, 3-n-butylphthalide, that has been demonstrated to lower blood pressure in rats.
Bergapten in the seeds can increase photosensitivity, so the use of essential oil externally in bright sunshine should be avoided. The oil and large doses of seeds should be avoided during pregnancy, as they can act as a uterine stimulant. Seeds intended for cultivation are not suitable for eating as they are often treated with fungicides.





Celery is used in weight-loss diets, where it provides low-calorie dietary fibre bulk. Celery is often incorrectly purported to be a "negative calorie food" based on the idea that the body will burn more calories during the digestion of the food than the body can extract from the food itself. However, the fact that the body uses very small amounts of energy in digestion compared to what can be extracted even from a low-calorie food like celery disproves this hypothesis.

18 Hearty Vegetarian Recipes for Fall

Some fantastic recipes and tips for Vegetarian Recipes! All from the Delish we site, I left the link at the end of the post!



18 Hearty Vegetarian Recipes for Fall



Meaty stews and casseroles aren't the only hearty meals for fall. These great vegetarian recipes are flavorful, filling, and a perfect complement for the cooler weather. From pasta and rice dishes to warm sandwiches and soups, there's a dish for everyone to enjoy.




Sweet Potato-Peanut Bisque

This satisfying vegetarian soup is inspired by the flavors of West African peanut soup. We like the added zip of hot green chiles, but they can sometimes be very spicy. It's best to add them slowly to taste.




Creamy Fettuccine with Brussels Sprouts and Mushrooms

Sliced Brussels sprouts and mushrooms cook quickly and cling to the pasta in our fall version of pasta primavera. Look for presliced mushrooms to cut prep time. Serve with a tossed salad.


* Click the link below to get all 18 Hearty Vegetarian Recipes for Fall *


http://www.delish.com/recipes/cooking-recipes/fall-vegetarian-recipes?src=nl&mag=del&list=nl_dhe_fot_non_092413_vegetarian-recipes#slide-1

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

Raisins will last for several months if they are wrapped tightly in plastic wrap or a plastic bag and kept at room temperature. They will last even longer (up to a year) if you place the plastic bag in the refrigerator.

Friday, September 27, 2013

Baked Stuffed Poblano Peppers w/ Mini Ears of Corn with Chili Lime Butter

Dinner Tonight: Baked Stuffed Poblano Peppers w/ Mini Ears of Corn with Chili Lime Butter







Spent the morning at a local park, just enjoying the beautiful weather. Then the family started our outdoor sprucing up for the rest of the day. For dinner finally got around to the Poblano Peppers, after being distracted by the Rainbow Trout yesterday. For dinner; Baked Stuffed Poblano Peppers w/ Mini Ears of Corn with Chili Lime Butter.





I had made Stuffed Jalapeno Peppers but it's the first time I've stuffed the Pablano Peppers. They're a lot easier to work with than the Jalapenos because their bigger and easier to handle. I started by splitting the Poblano Pepper in half and removed the seeds and ribs. Set them aside and gathered my stuffings for them. To stuff it with I used 1 packet Old El Paso Taco Seasoning, Jennie - O Extra Lean Ground Turkey Breast (120 calories 0 carbs), Uncle Ben's Whole Grain Medley Brown Rice and Quinoa with Garlic, and fresh grated Dutch Gouda Cheese. I cooked the Ground Turkey ahead of time that way when I stuffed it in the Pepper it wouldn't take as long when baking. As I fried the Ground Turkey I seasoned with Sea Salt, Ground Black Pepper, Roasted Ground Cumin, along with the Old El Paso Taco Seasoning Packet. After it was done I sit aside until I was ready to use for the Stuffing. The Uncle Ben's Whole Grain Medley Brown Rice and Quinoa with Garlic was leftover from the other night's dinner so I just had to reheat it a tad before adding into the Pepper.


Ready for the oven!

I also made  a Tomato Sauce to top or baste the Pepper in as it was baking. For the Sauce I used 1 8 oz. can of Tomato Sauce and 2 Green Onions that I diced up. In a small sauce pan I added the can of Tomato Sauce and the diced Green Onions and heated on medium heat for about 10 minutes and turned it on low until I was ready to use it. Having everything ready I Stuffed the peppers with the Ground Turkey and the Rice and Quinoa mixture. Ladled about half of the tomato sauce into a 13- by 9-inch casserole dish. Place the peppers on top and ladle over the remaining sauce. Sprinkle the Peppers with the Gouda Cheese, cover the casserole dish with foil and baked for 30 minutes. Removed the foil from the top and cooked until the peppers were very soft, about another 5 minutes. These came out incredible! Half of the Pepper was enough for me. The combination of the Peppers and all the ingredients worked well together to give some fantastic flavor! Have to keep this recipe.





I also boiled a couple of Green Giant Mini Ears of Corn that I buttered with a  Chili Lime Butter. The Butter is easy to make. Just took I Can't Believe It's Not Butter, 1 teaspoon Chili Powder, and zested 1/2 a Lime. Mixed it all together and done. The Stuffed Pepper and Corn makes one fine meal. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Chocolate Swirl Frozen Yogurt.









POBLANO PEPPERS


The poblano pepper is a mild chili pepper normally grown in Mexico. Fresh poblano peppers are wide and usually served stuffed. Poblanos have a mild taste like bell peppers. The Scoville Heat Unit is used to determine the level of heat in peppers. The measurement for a poblano pepper is 2,500 to 3,000 units, as compared to cayenne pepper, for instance, which has a heat unit of 35,000. Generally, poblano peppers have the same nutritional components as other chili peppers.



Poblano peppers, cooked or raw, are very low in calories and fat. The calorie and fat content does not change when cooked unless cooking oils or butter are added. One cooked poblano pepper has 13 calories. A poblano pepper has well under a half gram of fat, and only a small fraction of that is saturated fat. Poblano peppers do not have cholesterol. Extremely low-calorie foods, such as poblano peppers, make healthy snacks to maintain a low-calorie diet.




Cooked poblano peppers are low in carbohydrates. One poblano pepper contains 2.7 grams of carbohydrates, which is only 1 percent of the total daily value. Out of the 2.7 grams of carbohydrates, 1.1 gram is dietary fiber. This represents 4 percent of the recommended daily allowance of fiber. According to the Mayo Clinic, fiber has a number of health benefits, including regulating bowel movements, controlling blood sugar levels, reducing cholesterol and possibly aiding in weight loss.

Fall Harvest: Celeriac/Celery Root

Celeriac/celery root is at its best in the cooler months of fall, winter, and early spring (except in cold climates, where you'll find it during the summer and early fall).

A celeriac hypocotyl sliced in half, and with the greens removed



Celeriac (Apium graveolens var. rapaceum), also called turnip-rooted celery or knob celery, is a variety of celery cultivated for its edible roots, hypocotyl, and shoots; these are sometimes collectively (but erroneously) called celery root.
Celeriac is a root vegetable with a bulbous hypocotyl. In the Mediterranean Basin and in Northern Europe, celeriac grows wild and is widely cultivated. It is also cultivated in North Africa, Siberia, Southwest Asia, and North America. In North America, the Diamant cultivar predominates. Celeriac originated in the Mediterranean Basin.




Typically, celeriac is harvested when its hypocotyl is 10–14 cm in diameter. It is edible raw or cooked, and tastes similar to the stalks (the upper part of the stem) of common celery cultivars. Celeriac may be roasted, stewed, blanched, or mashed. Sliced celeriac occurs as an ingredient in soups, casseroles, and other savory dishes.
Unlike many root vegetables, celeriac contains little starch: 5–6% by weight. A number of vitamins and minerals are present in celery root, most notably vitamin C, potassium, and phosphorus.
The shelf life of celeriac is approximately three to four months if stored between 0°C (32°F) and 5°C (41°F), and not allowed to dry out.




8 Tricks for the Best Healthy Chili

Who doesn't love Chili! Here's some tips on making it healthier from the Eating Well Web site. I left the link at the bottom of the post.




Learn how to make chili even tastier with our tricks for the best chili.
Chili is the ultimate cold-weather comfort food. More than simply delicious, healthy chili is an easy one-pot meal made with ingredients you already have on hand, and can easily be stretched to feed a crowd on football Sundays or after a long day of raking or shoveling. Use these simple tricks to make chili healthy but still hearty and satisfying.



Chili Trick #1: Season Boldly
Using generous amounts of spice in your chili is a great way to add great flavor without any added fat or calories. Classic chili spices include chili and cumin (and cayenne for those who like it really hot). Have fun experimenting with different seasonings; cinnamon and allspice can add wonderful depth of flavor, like in our Pork & Plantain Chili.....




Chili Trick #2: Choose Lean Protein
To make a classic beef chili that’s still healthy, choose beef that is at least 90%-lean, which fits into the USDA guidelines for lean meats. Or opt for lean and flavorful ground turkey breast instead....




Click the link below to get all 8 tips for a healthier Chili!


http://www.eatingwell.com/healthy_cooking/healthy_cooking_101_basics_and_techniques/8_tricks_for_the_best_healthy_chili?sssdmh=dm17.692773&esrc=nwewtw091713

Kitchen Hint of the Day!


Lemons will stay fresh for up to three months if you store them in a bowl of water in the fridge. Just change the water every week. Who knew, not me!

Thursday, September 26, 2013

Cast Iron Skillet Blackened Rainbow Trout w/ Sliced new Potatoes and Cut Green Beans

Dinner Tonight: Cast Iron Skillet Blackened Rainbow Trout w/ Sliced new Potatoes and Cut Green Beans





Beautiful sunny day out, we're having a beautiful stretch of Fall sunny days. Helped spruce up the yard and went to a local Kroger. I went to get some Ground Turkey, which I did, but came across some beautiful Rainbow Trout I couldn't pass by! I also found some of the largest White Seedless Grapes I have ever seen, you can see them by the picture I took of them. As big as they were, they were just as sweet just bursting with flavor! I had haddock last night for dinner and just had to have the Rainbow Trout tonight. For dinner I prepared a Cast Iron Skillet Blackened Rainbow Trout w/ Sliced new Potatoes and Cut Green Beans.



The Rainbow Trout came from the Kroger Seafood Department. I rinsed the fillet off with water and patted dry with a paper towel. Melted a couple of tablespoons of Blue Bonnet Light Stick Butter down and rubbed the fillet down with the butter. Then seasoned it with a bit of Sea Salt and then with Zatarain’s Blackened Seasoning, rubbing the Blackened Seasoning in till both sides of the Trout were covered. Heated up the Cast Iron Skillet and fried the fillets. Always have your overhead stove fan on when Blackening, it will create the smoke! I started by frying it skin side down about 3 minutes then flipping it over and frying it another 3 minutes, looks perfect! Not only looked good but was delicious. Just love Blackened Fish, always just an incredible taste and smokiness.





For sides it was all thanks to Del Monte tonight! I heated up a can of Del Monte Sliced New Potatoes and a can of Del Monte Reduced Sodium Cut Green Beans. Just open, heat, and serve! For dessert later some of those huge White Seedless Grapes and a couple of slices of a Honeycrisp Apple.

September 29, 2012 30th annual Country Applefest - Lebanon, Ohio

September 29, 2012  30th annual Country Applefest - Lebanon, Ohio

The streets of historic downtown Lebanon will be filled with homemade crafts, great food and entertainment. Enter the apple bake off contest.




Historic downtown
Lebanon, Ohio

31st Annual Country Applefest

September 28th, 2013 - 10am to 7 pm

FREE Admission, One day only, Rain or Shine.



Free shuttle

from 10:00am - 7:30pm!
Park at Sweeney Chrysler Dodge Jeep
518 W. Main St (St. Rt. 63) and be shuttled to the festival area.



The streets of downtown Lebanon will be filled with homemade crafts, great food, and entertainment.

We hope to see you there!

http://www.countryapplefest.com/

Apple Cranberry Cake

Apple Cranberry Cake


The pass along recipe this week comes from Darlene, thanks Darlene!


Apple Cranberry Cake

ingredients:

5 large eggs, whites and yolks separated
1 cup unsalted butter
1/2 cup reduced fat sour cream
1 cup Splenda Sugar Blend
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 tablespoon lemon zest
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 cup cranberries, fresh or frozen
2 cups thinly sliced, peeled cooking apples

Directions:

* Preheat oven to 350°F (175°C).
* Whisk the softened butter, Splenda Sugar Blend, and sour cream in a dough mixer,
* Add one egg yolk at a time, slowly, followed by the lemon zest and juice.
* Beat the egg whites in a separate bowl till they reach the soft peek stage.
* Sift flour with the cinnamon, and baking powder.
* Fold the egg whites gently into the egg mixer. Sift the flour on top of it and fold again, adding cranberries.
* Pour the cake mixture in a greased 9 inch cake mold. Layer the apple slices on top in a circle. Push the apples slightly into the batter.
* Bake for 50-60 minutes or until cake tester comes out moist but clean.
Makes 10 servings.


** You can add 1 cup of chopped pecans or walnuts to the cake mixture **

Fall Harvest: Cauliflower

Cauliflower


Cauliflower may be grown, harvested, and sold year-round, but it is by nature a cool weather crop and at its best in fall and winter and into early spring.



Cauliflower is one of several vegetables in the species Brassica oleracea, in the family Brassicaceae. It is an annual plant that reproduces by seed. Typically, only the head (the white curd) is eaten. The cauliflower head is composed of a white inflorescence meristem. Cauliflower heads resemble those in broccoli, which differs in having flower buds.
Its name is from Latin caulis (cabbage) and flower,. Brassica oleracea also includes cabbage, brussels sprouts, kale, broccoli, and collard greens, though they are of different cultivar groups.
For such a highly modified plant, cauliflower has a long history. François Pierre La Varenne employed chouxfleurs in Le cuisinier françois. They were introduced to France from Genoa in the 16th century, and are featured in Olivier de Serres' Théâtre de l'agriculture (1600), as cauli-fiori "as the Italians call it, which are still rather rare in France; they hold an honorable place in the garden because of their delicacy", but they did not commonly appear on grand tables until the time of Louis XIV.





There are four major groups of cauliflower.
* Italian
Diverse in appearance, and biennial and annual in type, this group includes white, Romanesco, various green, purple, brown and yellow cultivars. This type is the ancestral form from which the others were derived.
* Northwest European biennial
Used in Europe for winter and early spring harvest, this was developed in France in the 19th century, and includes the old cultivars Roscoff and Angers.
* Northern European annuals
Used in Europe and North America for summer and fall harvest, it was developed in Germany in the 18th century, and includes the old cultivars Erfurt and Snowball.
* Asian
A tropical cauliflower used in China and India, it was developed in India during the 19th century from the now-abandoned Cornish type, and includes old varieties Early Patna and Early Benaras.




Purple cauliflower

There are hundreds of historic and current commercial varieties used around the world. A comprehensive list of about 80 North American varieties is maintained at North Carolina State University.
Colors:
* White
White cauliflower is the most common colour of cauliflower.
* Orange
Orange cauliflower (B. oleracea L. var. botrytis) contains 25% more vitamin A than white varieties. This trait came from a natural mutant found in a cauliflower field in Canada. Cultivars include 'Cheddar' and 'Orange Bouquet'.
* Green
Green cauliflower, of the B. oleracea botrytis group, is sometimes called broccoflower. It is available both with the normal curd shape and a variant spiky curd called Romanesco broccoli. Both types have been commercially available in the U.S. and Europe since the early 1990s. Green-curded varieties include 'Alverda', 'Green Goddess' and 'Vorda'. Romanesco varieties include 'Minaret' and 'Veronica'.
* Purple
The purple colour in this cauliflower is caused by the presence of the antioxidant group anthocyanins, which can also be found in red cabbage and red wine. Varieties include 'Graffiti' and 'Purple Cape'. In Great Britain and southern Italy, a broccoli with tiny flower buds is sold as a vegetable under the name "purple cauliflower". It is not the same as standard cauliflower with a purple curd.





Cauliflower is low in fat, low in carbohydrates but high in dietary fiber, folate, water, and vitamin C, possessing a high nutritional density.
Cauliflower contains several phytochemicals, common in the cabbage family, that may be beneficial to human health.
8 Sulforaphane, a compound released when cauliflower is chopped or chewed, may protect against cancer.
* Other glucosinolates
* Carotenoids
* Indole-3-carbinol, a chemical that enhances DNA repair, and acts as an estrogen antagonist, slowing the growth of cancer cells.
Boiling reduces the levels of these compounds, with losses of 20–30% after five minutes, 40–50% after ten minutes, and 75% after thirty minutes. However, other preparation methods, such as steaming, microwaving, and stir frying, have no significant effect on the compounds.
A high intake of cauliflower has been associated with reduced risk of aggressive prostate cancer.



Aloo gobi, an Indian dish prepared with cauliflower and potato


Cauliflower can be roasted, boiled, fried, steamed, or eaten raw. Steaming or microwaving better preserves anticancer compounds than boiling. When cooking, the outer leaves and thick stalks are removed, leaving only the florets. The leaves are also edible, but are most often discarded. The florets should be broken into similar-sized pieces so they are cooked evenly. After eight minutes of steaming, or five minutes of boiling, the florets should be soft, but not mushy (depending on size). Stirring while cooking can break the florets into smaller, uneven pieces.
Low carbohydrate dieters can use cauliflower as a reasonable substitute for potatoes or rice; while they can produce a similar texture, or mouth feel, they lack the starch of the originals.





Burger King adding low-fat French fries, 'Satisfries'



Burger King Worldwide Inc. said it has developed French fries containing 40 percent less fat and 30 percent fewer calories than those sold by its arch rival McDonald's Corp. The new crinkle-cut fries, to be called Satisfries, will contain 190 calories, 8 grams of fat, and 210 milligrams of sodium for a “value-size” serving.
“One out of every two Burger King guests orders our classic French fries and we know our guests are hungry for options that are better for them,” said Burger King President of North America, Alex Macedo.

The chain made the claims about lower-fat and lower-calorie fries, which come as consumer groups in the United States increase pressure on the food industry to offer healthier alternatives, on its website late Monday.



Fast food chains have come under fire from health groups for contributing to an obesity problem in the U.S. by selling high-fat content food. About two-thirds of adults in this country are overweight and one-third are obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in a report published in May. Rising obesity leads to higher medical costs and risks of disease like diabetes and heart-disease.
Other popular fast food chains have also been trying to get rid of their junk-food tag, with McDonald’s offering an under-400-calories menu, while Dunkin’ Brands Group Inc. introduced a DD Smart menu. Yum! Brands Inc.’s KFC is also trying to make kids’ meals healthier offering grilled chicken, applesauce and green beans.
Burger King, home of the Whopper, said the difference between Satisfries and its classic French fries is that less oil is absorbed in the cooking process.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

Grapes will stay fresh only for three to five days, even if refrigerated. They keep best in a plastic bag in the coldest part of the refrigerator, but they must be washed very well before eating. If you do wash them before storing, make sure to dry them thoroughly, as they'll absorb water. Grapes can be eaten frozen (they're especially tasty treats), and frozen grapes can be used in cooking; however, they become mushy when they're thawed because of high water content. They'll keep in the freezer for about 1 year.

Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Fried Seasoned Haddock w/ Whole Grain Medley - Quinoa and Brown Rice and...

Dinner Tonight: Fried Seasoned Haddock w/ Whole Grain Medley - Quinoa and Brown Rice and Green Lettuce and Radish Salad





Another beautiful day out, just a tad warmer. I wasn't able to get out and enjoy much of it though I had a computer glitch that took a wile to correct. For dinner tonight I prepared a Fried Seasoned Haddock w/ Whole Grain Medley - Quinoa and Brown Rice and Green Lettuce and Radish Salad.





I had purchased a couple of fillets of Haddock a couple of days ago and had already cleaned, cut them into smaller pieces, and froze them. I took one package out and let it thaw overnight in the fridge. To prepare them I seasoned them with some Sea Salt and put them in a sealable plastic bag along with some Zatarain's Lemon Pepper Breading Mix. Shook until they were well coated on all sides. Removed from the bag, shook off the excess Breading Mix and pan fried them in Canola Oil. Fried them about 3 minutes per side till it had that Golden Brown Crust on both sides. As usual the Haddock was delicious! The Zatarain's Breading Mix is hard to beat for any Fish or Seafood.



To go with the Haddock I heated up some Uncle Ben's Whole Grain Medley Brown Rice and Quinoa with Garlic. The Uncle Ben's Ready Rice is one of the best things that Uncle Ben's done with Rice! It comes in a microwavable bag. Just microwave it according to the bag instructions and it's hot and ready. The Quinoa and Brown Rice is my favorite. I also made another Salad using the Green Lettuce I had used the other night. With the Lettuce I added some sliced Radishes, fresh grated Parm Cheese, and topped with the Ken's Steakhouse Light Options Sweet Vandalia Onion Dressing. Still suffer from upset stomach when eating green leaf vegetables but I love salads, so it's worth the upset stomach! For dessert later a 100 Calorie Bag of Jolly Time Pop Corn.







UNCLE BEN'S® WHOLE GRAIN MEDLEY™ Brown Rice and Quinoa

The rice that’s always ready to enjoy. Our Roasted Garlic Medley combines whole grain brown rice with red and black quinoa. It is infused with the delicious taste and aroma of roasted garlic and it’s ready to enjoy in just 90 seconds. Plus, it delivers 100% whole grains and meets the full daily requirement of whole grains in just one serving! The microwaveable pouch also eliminates prep and cleanup.


Nutritional Claims & Product Benefits:

Meets the full daily requirement of whole grains‡
* Cholesterol Free
* 0g Trans Fat
* No Saturated Fat
* 100% Whole Grain
* Good Source of Folic Acid


COOKING INSTRUCTIONS
Squeeze pouch to separate rice.
Tear to vent.
Heat on HIGH for 90 seconds.
Cooking time for 2 pouches – 2 ½ minutes. Microwave times may vary. Take care when handling and opening the hot pouch. Refrigerate unused portion.

In the Skillet
Gently squeeze the sides of the pouch to break apart the rice, and pour contents into a skillet. Add 2 Tbsp. of water and heat.
Stir rice occasionally until heated thoroughly.
Serve immediately.



Nutrition Facts
Serving Size: 1 cup
Servings Per Container: 2
 
Calories 200
     Calories from Fat 30
Amount Per Serving and/or % Daily Value*
Total Fat 3 g (5%)
     Saturated Fat 0 g (0%)
     Trans Fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg (0%)
Sodium 560 mg (23%)
Potassium 150 mg (4%)
Total Carbohydrate 38 g (13%)
     Dietary Fiber 3 g (12%)
     Sugars 0 g
Protein 5 g
Vitamin A 2%
Vitamin C 2%
Calcium 2%
Iron 4%
Thiamin 15%
Niacin 20%
Folate 15%



http://www.unclebens.com/Products/Ready-Whole-Grain-Medley/White-Rice#.UkMlIobOk20

Fall Harvest: Cabbage



Cabbage is bright and crisp when raw and mellows and sweetens the longer it's cooked. The cooler the weather when it's harvested, the sweeter it tends to taste (this effect is called "frost kissed").




Cabbage (Brassica oleracea or variants) is a leafy green biennial plant, grown as an annual vegetable crop for its dense-leaved heads. Closely related to other cole crops, such as broccoli, cauliflower, and brussels sprouts, it descends from B. oleracea var. oleracea, a wild field cabbage. Cabbage heads generally range from 1 to 8 pounds (0.5 to 4 kg), and can be green, purple and white. Smooth-leafed firm-headed green cabbages are the most common, with smooth-leafed red and crinkle-leafed savoy cabbages of both colors seen more rarely.
It is difficult to trace the exact history of cabbage, but it was most likely domesticated somewhere in Europe before 1000 BC. By the Middle Ages, it was a prominent part of European cuisine, although savoys were not developed until the 16th century. Cabbage heads are generally picked during the first year of the plants' life cycles, but those intended for seed are allowed to grow a second year, and must be kept separated from other cole crops to prevent cross pollination. Cabbage is prone to several nutrient deficiencies, as well as multiple pests, bacteria and fungal diseases.
The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) reports that world production of cabbage and other brassicas for calendar year 2011 was almost 69 million metric tons (68 million long tons; 75 million short tons). Almost half of these crops were grown in China, although Chinese cabbage is the most popular form of the vegetable in that country. Cabbages are prepared in many different ways for eating, although pickling, in dishes such as sauerkraut, is the most popular. Cabbage is a good source of beta-carotene, vitamin C, and fiber. Contaminated cabbage has been linked to cases of food-borne illness in humans.





Cabbage seedlings have a thin taproot and cordate (heart-shaped) cotyledons. The first leaves produced are ovate (egg-shaped) with a lobed petiole. Plants are 40–60 cm (16–24 in) tall in their first year at the mature vegetative stage, and 1.5–2.0 m (4.9–6.6 ft) tall when flowering in the second year. Heads average between 1 and 8 pounds (0.5 and 4 kg), with earlier varieties producing smaller heads. Most cabbages have thick, alternating leaves, with margins that range from wavy or lobed to highly dissected; some varieties have a waxy bloom on the leaves. Plants have root systems that are fibrous and shallow. About 90 percent of the root mass is in the upper 20–30 cm (8–12 in) of soil, although some lateral roots can penetrate up to 2 m (6.6 ft) deep.
The inflorescence is an unbranched and indeterminate terminal raceme measuring 50–100 cm (20–40 in) tall, with flowers that are yellow or white. Each flower has four petals set in a perpendicular pattern, as well as four sepals, six stamens, and a superior ovary that is two-celled and contains a single stigma and style. Two of the six stamens have shorter filaments. The fruit is a silique that opens at maturity through dehiscence to reveal brown or black seeds that are small and round in shape. Self-pollination is impossible, and plants are cross-pollinated by insects. The initial leaves form a rosette shape comprising 7 to 15 leaves, each measuring 25–35 cm (10–14 in) by 20–30 cm (8–12 in); after this, leaves with shorter petioles develop and heads form through the leaves cupping inward.
Many shapes, colors and leaf textures are found in various cabbage varieties. Leaf types are generally divided between crinkled-leaf, loose-head savoys and smooth-leaf firm-head cabbages, while the color spectrum includes white and a range of greens and purples. Oblate, round and pointed shapes are found.
Cabbage has been selectively bred for head weight and morphological characteristics, frost hardiness, fast growth and storage ability. The appearance of the cabbage head has been given importance in selective breeding, with varieties being chosen for shape, color, firmness and other physical characteristics. Breeding objectives are now focused on increasing resistance to various insects and diseases and improving the nutritional content of cabbage. Scientific research into the genetic modification of B. oleracea crops, including cabbage, has included European Union and United States explorations of greater insect and herbicide resistance. However, genetically modified B. oleracea crops are not currently used in commercial agriculture.


Green and purple cabbages



There are several cultivars of cabbage, each including many varieties:
* Savoy – Characterized by crimped or curly leaves, mild flavor and tender texture
* Spring Greens – Loose-headed, commonly sliced and steamed
* Green – Light to dark green, slightly pointed heads. This is the most commonly grown cultivar.
* Red – Smooth red leaves, often used for pickling or stewing
* White (also called Dutch) – Smooth, pale green leaves
Some sources only delineate three cultivars: savoy, red and white, with spring greens and green cabbage being subsumed into the latter.





Cabbage is used in many ways, ranging from eating raw and simple steaming to pickling, stewing, sauteing or braising. Pickling is one of the most popular ways of preserving cabbage, creating dishes such as sauerkraut and kimchee, although kimchee is more often made from Chinese cabbage (B. rapa). Savoy cabbages are usually used in salads, while smooth-leaf types are utilized for both fresh market sales and processing. Bean curd and cabbage is a staple of Chinese cooking, while the British dish bubble and squeak is made primarily with salt beef and boiled cabbage. Cabbage is used extensively in Polish cuisine. It is one of the main food crops, and sauerkraut is a frequent dish, as well as being used to stuff other dishes such as golabki (stuffed cabbage) and pierogi (filled pasta). Other eastern European countries, such as Hungary and Romania, also have traditional dishes that feature cabbage as a main ingredient. In India and Ethiopia, cabbage is often used in spicy salads and braises. In the United States, cabbage is used primarily for the production of coleslaw, followed by fresh market use and sauerkraut production. Cabbage consumption varies widely around the world, with the Russians eating the largest amount in Europe, at 20 kilograms (44 lb) per capita, while Belgians consume 4.7 kilograms (10 lb), the Dutch 4.0 kilograms (8.8 lb), Americans 3.9 kilograms (8.6 lb) and the Spaniards 1.9 kilograms (4.2 lb).
The characteristic flavor of cabbage is caused by glucosinolates, a class of sulfur-containing glucosides. Although found throughout the plant, these compounds are concentrated in the highest quantities in the seeds; lesser quantities are found in young vegetative tissue, and they decrease as the tissue ages. Cooked cabbage is often criticized for its pungent, unpleasant odor and taste. These develop when cabbage is overcooked and a hydrogen sulfide gas is produced.


White cabbage



Cabbage is a good source of beta-carotene, vitamin C and fiber. It is a cruciferous vegetable, and has been shown to reduce the risk of some cancers, especially those in the colorectal group. This is possibly due to the glucosinolates found in cole crops, which serve as metabolic detoxicants, or due to the sulphoraphane content, also responsible for metabolic anti-carcinogenic activities. Purple cabbage also contains anthocyanins, which in other vegetables have been proven to have anti-carcinogenic properties. Along with other cole crops, cabbage is a source of indole-3-carbinol, a chemical that boosts DNA repair in cells and appears to block the growth of cancer cells. Research suggests that boiling these vegetables reduces their anti-carcinogenic properties.






Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week - Buffalo Pastrami & Zucchini Linguine

Can it get much healthier, Buffalo Pastrami & Zucchini Linguine! Another good one from Jill O'Brien of Wild Idea Buffalo.


Buffalo Pastrami & Zucchini Linguine (Serves 2)
By: Jill O'Brien



Ingredients:

1/4 lb. Wild Idea Buffalo Pastrami, julienned
4 oz, linguine, cooked al dente
(reserve 1 cup pasta water)
1 medium sized zucchini
4 Tb. basil pesto
1/2 cup cherry or pear tomatoes
grated Parmesan
Cooking Directions:

Prepare Buffalo Pastrami and linguine as suggested. Using vegetable peeler, peel zucchini in flat ribbons and then slice ribbons in half, lengthways.
In heavy bottomed pot, bring 1/2 cup of pasta water to gentle boil.
Add zucchini and cook for two minutes. Remove zucchini from water and set aside.
Add prepared pasta to pot, adding more pasta water if necessary. Cover and let heat through, about 2 minutes.
Add basil pesto and toss lightly.
Add zucchini back to pot and julienned pastrami. Gently toss together. Cover and let heat for an addition minute or two.
Using large fork, twist pasta into desired serving and transfer to pasta dish. Garnish with tomatoes, and sprinkle with Parmesan. Season with a pinch of salt and a twist of fresh cracked pepper.
Simply Delicious! You might also like my recipe for a Zucchini Salad, found in the “Various Recipe” section.


http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/6322/






8 oz. Buffalo Pastrami
We may be 1,700 miles from a New York deli, but this pastrami has done its homework. Our buffalo Top Rounds are completely trimmed and gorgeously flavored without the need for excessive fat. This tasty goodness will get you hooked on sandwiches. Pastrami comes pre-sliced in a 8 oz. package.

Ingredients: Buffalo, Organic Spices:[Black Pepper, Coriander, Garlic Juice, Salt, Sugar] Natural Acetic & Citric Acid, Veg Stable {celery powder, sea salt, silicon dioxide (anti caking)}, water.


http://buy.wildideabuffalo.com/products/8-oz-buffalo-pastrami

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

We hate throwing anything away, so you can imagine how delighted we were when we heard this great new use for orange rinds. After you've peeled an orange, stick a small piece of the rind in a sealed container with brown sugar, fresh herbs, or anything else that easily dries out. The moisture in the oranges is just enough to keep it fresh.

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Chicken ‘n’ Noodles w/ Cut Green Beans and Whole Grain Bread

Dinner Tonight: Chicken ‘n’ Noodles w/ Cut Green Beans and Whole Grain Bread






Another very cool morning and beautiful Fall Day out again. Stopped by Jungle Jim's Market with my parents, picked up some produce and Ocean Perch. Love that store, there's always something going on in the store and today they cooking breakfast dishes with Ostrich Eggs! Amazing how huge those Eggs are, big enough to feed 5 people on 1 Egg (if not more). For dinner tonight I prepared Chicken ‘n’ Noodles w/ Cut Green Beans and Whole Grain Bread.





I used Margaret Holmes Simple Suppers Chicken n Noodles Fixins’. Another of my favorite Comfort Foods! It comes in a 5 serving can and contains the Noodles and Fixings, I added the Chicken. I used 2 Boneless and Skinless Chicken Breasts seasoning them with Sea Salt, Ground Black Pepper, Ground Smoked Cumin, and Parsley. I then fried them in a large skillet until done, removed and sliced into small pieces. Then added the Chicken back to the pan along with the can of Noodles and Fixins’. Cooked until it the Sauce was bubbling and heated throughout. The broth that’s with Noodles is incredible! Rich and thick and seasoned just right. I left the info and web site link to Margaret Holmes at the end of the post.





I also heated up a can of Del Monte Low Sodium Cut Green Beans and a couple of slices of buttered Healthy Life Whole Grain Bread. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Chocolate Swirl Frozen Yogurt.








Margaret Holmes Simple Suppers Chicken n' Noodles Fixins


Chicken n’ Noodles will become a comfort-food favorite in any household. Add boneless, skinless chicken breast to a can of Simple Suppers Chicken n’ Noodles, which is filled with plump noodle dumplings and special seasonings.

Nutrition Facts
Serving Size Serving size 2/3 cup as packaged (174g)

Amount Per Serving
Calories from Fat 45
Calories 230

% Daily Values*
Total Fat 3g 5%
Saturated Fat 1g 5%
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 0g
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 15mg 5%
Sodium 860mg 36%
Potassium 0mg
Total Carbohydrate 20g 7%
Dietary Fiber 1g 4%
Sugars 0g
Protein 8g



http://www.margaretholmes.com/

September 26-29, 2013 Barnesville Pumpkin Festival - Barnesville, Ohio

September 26-29, 2013  Barnesville Pumpkin Festival - Barnesville, Ohio





The Barnesville Pumpkin Festival has become a tradition for families and friends who come each year to enjoy one of Ohio's oldest and most popular festivals. Always held during the last full weekend in September, the Festival includes four days of fun-filled contests, entertainment, tastes, sights and sounds.  The festival started in 1963 in the basement of the Catholic Church and has has evolved from a small street fair to a premier event with visitors attending from all over the United States. Both adults and children will enjoy harvest-inspired arts and crafts, home-style foods, entertainment on two stages, a giant weigh-in of champion pumpkins, lots of fun contests and the Giant Pumpkin Festival Parade on Saturday. There is plenty to see and do and, best of all, admission is free.


http://www.barnesvillepumpkinfestival.com/