Sunday, March 31, 2013

Ocean Perch w/ Potato Pancakes, Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread


Today's Menu: Ocean Perch w/ Potato Pancakes, Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread




Happy Easter Everyone! Hope you all are having a nice one.  My parents had an dinner invitation so they
went out to eat for dinner. So I didn't want to prepare a big Easter Dinner for one and I wasn't in the mood for Ham or Lamb really. For my dinner I prepared Ocean Perch w/ Potato Pancakes, Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread.





I had purchased the Ocean Perch from Meijer's Seafood Department a while back and had them frozen in the freezer. After they thawed I rinsed them with water and patted dry. I seasoned them with Sea Salt, Ground Black Pepper, and Zantarain Creole Seasoning. I pan fried them in Canola Oil about 3 minutes per side. They fried up a nice golden brown and I served them with a new Remoulade Sauce I had purchased, Louisana Remoulade Dressing. And yes I have found the perfect Remoulade Sauce! Love this stuff, I even put a little bit of it on my Potato Pancakes. A really good sauce.



For side dishes I prepared Potato Pancakes, Cut Green Beans, and two slices of Aunt Millie's Light Whole Grain Bread. I used MANISCHEWITZ Potato Pancake Mix, my favorite Potato Pancake Mix. Just mix with Water, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Egg Beaters, Sea Salt, and Pepper. Fry until golden and your ready! I left the product info and directions at the end of the post. the Green Beans were Del Monte Cut Green Beans. For dessert/snack later some Newman's Own Black Bean and Corn Salsa along with some Tostito's Whole Grain Scoops.




MANISCHEWITZ Potato Pancake Mix

Ingredients
Potatoes ( Contains Sulfites to Maintain Whiteness), Potato Starch, Salt, Onion, Vegetable Shortening (Partially Hydrogenated Cottonseed Oil).

Directions
Makes 18-24 pancakes. You Will Need: Medium bowl, 2 eggs, 2 1/4 cups cold water, vegetable oil, large skillet. 1. Mix: In a medium bowl, beat two eggs with a fork until blended. Add 2 1/4 cups cold water and mix well. Stir in the contents of this package. Allow batter to thicken for 3 to 4 minutes. Stir. 2. Fry: Drop tablespoons of batter into 1/8 inch hot vegetable oil in a large skillet and brown on both sides.





Nutrition Facts

Serving size: 3 cakes
Amount Per Serving
Calories 80
Calories from Fat 10
Calories from Saturated Fat
Amount Per Serving and/or % Daily Value*
Total Fat 1g (1%)
Saturated Fat 0.5g (4%)
Polyunsaturated Fat
Monounsaturated Fat
Trans Fat 0g (0%)
Cholesterol 0mg (0%)
Sodium 500mg (21%)
Potassium
Total Carbohydrate 18g (6%)
Dietary Fiber 2g (9%)

http://www.manischewitz.com/sidesandmixesproducts.html



LOUISIANA Remoulade Dressing

Description: LOUISIANA Remoulade Dressing is typically a cold dressing served with chilled boiled seafood. This dressing combines the perfect blend of soybean oil, horseradish, egg yolks, tomato paste, onion, garlic and other spices. Use it as a dipping sauce for your favorite seafoods or meats


Ingredients soybean oil, horseradish, corn syrup, vinegar, egg yolk, water, tomato paste, spices and flavorings, salt, garlic powder, onion powder, xanthan gum, caramel color, tumeric and less than .1% sodium benzoate added as a preservative.



NUTRITION

Calories 80
Calories from fat 70
Total fat 7
Saturated fat 1
Saturated fat per unit 5
Cholesterol 0
Cholesterol per unit 0
Sodium 100
Sodium per unit 4
Total carbs 2

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

If you find icing too sweet or too rich, try this cake topping: Set a paper lace doily on the cake, and then dust lightly with confectioners' sugar. Carefully lift the doily off the cake, and admire the beautiful design. Try colored confectioners' sugar or a mixture of confectioners' sugar and cocoa powder.

Saturday, March 30, 2013

Italian Style Chicken Breast and Herb Fettuccine w/ Crab meat, Shrimp, and Corn Fritter


Dinner Tonight: Italian Style Chicken Breast and Herb Fettuccine w/ Crab meat, Shrimp, and Corn Fritter Appetizer




As I posted earlier we actually have some Spring Flowers popping up, seriously check my earlier post and
picture! They say it's our last nice day until Wednesday but hopefully Spring is getting a foothold! For dinner tonight something I haven't tried; Italian Style Chicken Breast and Herb Fettuccine w/ Crab meat, Shrimp, and Corn Fritter Appetizer.





I was just going to have the Chicken and Fettuccine but I came across these Fritters last night and they sounded good so I added them to the dinner as an appetizer. For the Chicken i used Perdue Marinated Italian Style Chicken Breasts. First time I tried them and they turned out very good! You can grill them, fry them, or bake them. They come individually wrapped, about 5 per package. It's only 140 calories and 2 carbs per Chicken Breast. I baked mine at 350 degrees for about 22 minutes. They came tender and moist with very good Italian Seasoning. These will be good to freeze for anytime.



For the Fettuccine I used  al Dente Egg Noodle Fettuccine. Very easy to prepare; boil your water and add the pasta. Heat for 3 minutes and it’s ready and it’s 190 calories, 31 carbs, and 1 gram of fat. After boiling I seasoned it with Sea Salt and McCormick Grinder Italian Seasoning. To serve I made a bed of the Fettuccine and topped it with a sliced Italian Style Chicken Breast.



Now for the Crab meat, Shrimp, and Corn Fritter Appetizer. i needed 1 cup (1/2 package) ZATARAIN'S® Crispy Southern Hush Puppy Mix, 1 small onion, finely chopped, 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped, 2 tablespoons chopped chives, 1/2 teaspoon ZATARAIN'S® Creole Seasoning, 1/2 cup water, 1/4 pound claw crab meat, 1/4 pound cooked peeled small shrimp, coarsely chopped, 1/2 cup thawed frozen corn, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, for frying. Just mix all your ingredients together and fry! I left the full recipe at the end of the post. I really like how these turned out. Everything came together and made one delicious Fritter!  The Corn I think really made it right. I served it with a side of Kraft Chipotle Deli Mayo, nice smooth heat. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Double Chocolate Pudding.





PERDUE® PERFECT PORTIONS® Boneless, Skinless Chicken Breasts, Italian Style (1.5 lbs.)

PERDUE® PERFECT PORTIONS® Boneless, Skinless Chicken Breasts are PERFECTLY SIZED, PERFECTLY PACKAGED and PERFECTLY DELICIOUS!



Nutrition:

Serving Size 1 Filet (136g/4.8 oz.)
Servings Per Container 5
Amount Per Serving (* % of Daily Value)
Calories 140
Calories from Fat 10
Total Fat 1.5g (2%)
Saturated Fat 0g (0%)
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 75mg (25%)
Sodium 360mg (15%)
Total Carbohydrate 2g (1%)
Dietary Fiber 0g (0%)
Sugars 1g
Protein 26g




al dente egg fettuccine

Perfect for any occasion, any recipe, whether it is chicken soup, fettuccine alfredo or simply pasta with fresh tomatoes, olive oil and Parmesan cheese. Parents from all over the country write to us saying that even their kids can tell the difference between Al Dente Egg Fettuccine and others. That makes us feel so good!

http://www.aldentepasta.com/product-categories/fettuccines/







Crabmeat and Shrimp Fritters

Crabmeat and Shrimp Fritters:
1 cup (1/2 package) ZATARAIN'S® Crispy Southern Hush Puppy Mix
1 small onion, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 tablespoons chopped chives
1/2 teaspoon ZATARAIN'S® Creole Seasoning
1/2 cup water
1/4 pound claw crabmeat
1/4 pound cooked peeled small shrimp, coarsely chopped
1/2 cup thawed frozen corn
extra virgin olive oil, for frying

Directions
1. For the Dressing, place all ingredients in food processor; cover. Process until smooth. Spoon into small bowl. Cover. Refrigerate at least 1 hour to blend flavors.

2. For the Fritters, mix Hush Puppy Mix, onion, garlic, chives and Creole Seasoning in large bowl. Add water; mix just until moistened. Gently stir in crabmeat, shrimp and corn.

3. Pour oil into heavy skillet, filling no more than 1/3 full. Heat to 375°F on medium heat. Drop batter by heaping tablespoonfuls, a few at a time, into hot oil. Fry 3 to 4 minutes or until golden brown. Drain on paper towels. Serve fritters with Creole Tomato Dressing.
Nutritional Info per 1 serving

Calories: 441 Sodium: 734

Fat: 37 Carbohydrates: 19

Cholesterol: 52 Fiber: 1

Protein: 8

Has Spring Sprung?

Our first signs of Spring around here, hopefully!      

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

If your about to show off your cake prowess by cutting up baked cakes and re-assembling them in an impressive configuration, try freezing the cake first. Fresh cakes, especially those made from a box mix, often crumble easily, but freezing will make your knife glide right through. Freezing detracts little from the taste of your cake, as long as you don't frost it first.

Friday, March 29, 2013

Teriyaki Pineapple Turkey Burgers w/ Baked Crinkle Fries


Dinner Tonight: Teriyaki Pineapple Turkey Burgers w/ Baked Crinkle Fries





It was a beautiful day out today, sunny and in the mid 50's. 60 tomorrow but rain and snow flurries possible Monday. So today I had somebody clean all our gutters out, which were full of leaves. Got the car washed and cleaned on the inside also. Long Spring cleaning list if it ever warms up! For dinner a Teriyaki Pineapple Turkey Burger w/ Baked Crinkle Fries.



To make the burger you’ll need; Kikkoman Less Sodium Teriyaki Marinade and Sauce, Dole Pineapple Panko Bread Crumbs. the original recipe made 4 burgers I broke the recipe down to make 2, 1 for lunch tomorrow. When frying the burger keep a close eye on it because it start to burn due to the Teriyaki Sauce.
slices and juice, Honeysuckle White Extra Lean Ground Turkey (99/1), fresh Ginger (grated), and


To prepare it just stir together Kikkoman Teriyaki Base & Glaze and reserved pineapple juice in a small bowl. Remove 2 tablespoons sauce for burgers. Mix together turkey, ginger, Kikkoman Panko Bread Crumbs and 1 teaspoon Teriyaki mixture and shape into a pattie. I then pan fried it in Extra Virgin Olive Oil about 4 1/2 minutes per side brushing it with the remaining Teriyaki mixture. Placed the pineapple slice in the pan and cooked until lightly golden brown. Served the burger on a Aunt Millie's Light Whole Grain Bun with, Light Mayonnaise and Pineapple. This makes one fine and juicy burger! The Teriyaki Sauce is perfect with the Turkey and Pineapple and the Mayo just adds to the flavor. I left the original recipe at the bottom of the post, makes 4 Turkey Burgers.



For a side I baked some Ore Ida Crinkle Cut Fries, served with a side of Hunt's Ketchup. Then for dessert later a slice of Pillsbury Nut Quick Bread topped with a Pineapple slice (Leftover from dinner).





Teriyaki Pineapple Turkey Burgers


Ingredients (Makes 4 servings)

1/4 cup Kikkoman Teriyaki Baste & Glaze, divided
1 can (8oz.) pineapple slices, drained, reserve 1/4 cup juice
1 pound ground turkey or chicken
1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
1/4 cup Kikkoman Panko Bread Crumbs
4 whole grain hamburger buns
4 slices Cheddar or Monterrey Jack cheese



Instructions

Stir together Kikkoman Teriyaki Base & Glaze and reserved pineapple juice in a small bowl. Remove 2 tablespoons sauce for burgers.

Mix together turkey, ginger, Kikkoman Panko Bread Crumbs and 2 tablespoons Teriyaki mixture. Shape into 4 patties.

Grill patties, brushing with remaining Teriyaki mixture until desired doneness. Place pineapple slices on grill and cook until lightly golden brown.

Serve burger on buns with cheese and pineapple.


http://www.kikkomanusa.com/homecooks/recipes/recipedetail.php?rd=12989#.UVXplRzOk20

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

Make sure you get rid of any bubbles in you cake batter before baking it. This is easily accomplished by holding the pan an inch or two above the counter and tapping it two or three times to release any air pockets. Just be careful-the batter might splatter.

Thursday, March 28, 2013

Bison Sirloin Steak and Sauteed Mushrooms w/ Baked Potato and Cut Green Beans


Today's Menu: Bison Sirloin Steak and Sauteed Mushrooms w/ Baked Potato and Cut Green Beans




It was nice enough to get out and have the car washed of all the dirt and salt from winter, still cold out but
sunny. We just seem not to be able to get away from Winter around here. I'm out of my favorite Wild Idea Buffalo Top Sirloin so I went to Kroger and picked up a Great Range Bison Sirloin, which isn't a bad second choice what so ever. For dinner tonight; Bison Sirloin Steak and Sauteed Mushrooms w/ Baked Potato and Cut Green Beans.




i prepared a 6 oz. Bison Sirloin. I seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn. I pan fried it in Canola Oil about 4 minutes per side, medium rare. As usual it came tender and bursting with that Bison, or Buffalo if you prefer, fresh and sweet flavor. I topped it with Sauteed Baby Bella Mushrooms.



T o go with the Bison I prepared a Baked Potato that I topped with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn and I Can't Believe It's Not Butter. I also had heated up a single serving can of Del Monte Cut Green Beans and a couple of slices of Aunt Millie's Light Whole Grain Bread. For dessert later a Jello Sugarless Double Chocolate Pudding.

Kitchen Hints of the Day! (Not as Healthy and Healthy)


Hint #1 - When baking a cake, try substituting two egg yolks for one whole egg. The cake will be very rich and dense, because the yolks won't hold as much air as whites. This isn't exactly a healthy tip, but it will sure taste good!



Hint #2 - For a light, moist cake, enhance your cake flour by adding 2 tablespoons cornstarch to every cup of flour, then sifting them together before you add to the mix. You may be surprised by the results!

Kashi® 7 Whole Grain Cereals Puffs


Kashi® 7 Whole Grain Cereals Puffs



Here lately I've been buying Kashi® 7 Whole Grain Cereals Puffs. Their great for Breakfast or for snacking. Great taste and only 70 calories, 0.5 g total fat, and 15 carbs per serving (1cup). So far I've only found the Whole Grain Puffs at Kroger.





Kashi® 7 Whole Grain Cereals Puffs


Enjoy the pure simplicity of our tasty 7 Whole Grain & Sesame blend in toasty flakes, hearty puffs, or crunchy nuggets.
Treat your taste buds to the purest form of whole grains and sesame seeds. Nothing more added, nothing taken out.


Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 1 cup (20.4 g)
Amount Per Serving
Calories 70Calories from Fat 5
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.5g1%
Saturated Fat 0.0g0%
Trans Fat 0.0g
Cholesterol 0mg0%
Sodium 0mg0%
Total Carbohydrates 15.0g5%
Dietary Fiber 1.0g4%
Protein 2.0g


http://www.kashi.com/products/kashi_puffs_original




Kashi

Since 1984, Kashi has cared about making foods with the health of people and planet in mind. We've stayed true to our 7 whole grain roots and remain passionate about providing a progressive and holistic approach to nutrition. Now we're taking our mission a step further. Today, only 1% of U.S. cropland is organic and around 70% of packaged foods contain GMOs (genetically modified organisms). At Kashi, we want to do our part in creating a more balanced food system. We're still small at heart, but big enough now to make a meaningful impact.


Eleven Foods Already Non-GMO Project Verified.

This long-term commitment follows the Non-GMO Project Verification of eleven Kashi foods earlier this year, including:


Autumn Wheat®
Cinnamon Harvest®
Island Vanilla®
Strawberry Fields®
7 Whole Grain Flakes®
7 Whole Grain Puffs®
7 Whole Grain Pilaf®
Simply Maize®
Indigo Morning®
Berry Fruitful®
Blackberry Hills®


http://www.kashi.com/

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Panko Crusted Orange Roughy Fish Sandwich w/ Cheddar Cheese Ramen Noodles


Dinner Tonight: Panko Crusted Orange Roughy Fish Sandwich w/ Cheddar Cheese Ramen Noodles




Very windy and cold out today but it's sunny, which helps after all the gray and cold days we've had lately. I
know I just had Crappie for dinner yesterday but I stuck with fish having Orange Roughy, I prepared a Panko Crusted Orange Roughy Fish Sandwich w/ Cheddar Cheese Ramen Noodles. Your thinking why Ramen Noodles, they had them on sale at Walmart a while back at Walmart. Ramen Noodles will always hold a warm place in my heart. Another lifetime ago I was a newlywed and my wife did not know how to cook, she was terrible! You ask how terrible?? The first time she cooked a full meal after were married I got so sick I had to go the emergency room, food poisoning! She had made Pork Chops and the Pork was bad. I made it a point to learn how to cook after that. I found Ramen Noodles was an easy dish to prepare until I learned to cook. That's the story behind Ramen Noodles.



For dinner tonight I prepared myself a Panko Crusted Orange Roughy Fish sandwich w/ Cheddar Cheese Ramen Noodles. I had an Orange Roughy filet in the freezer so I laid it out to thaw early this morning. So after it thawed I rinsed the fillet and rolled it in Flour then dipping them into Egg Beater’s, shaking off the excess. Then rolling them in a Panko Bread Crumbs, onion powder, garlic powder, and paprika mix until covered on both sides of the fillets. I then lightly fried them about 4 minutes per side in Canola Oil. It came out golden brown with a great crunch from the Panko Crumbs and delicious! I served it on a Aunt Millie's   Light Whole Grain Bun.



For a side to go with my Sandwich I prepared Nissen Original Chow Noodles/Cheddar Cheese Flavor Ramen Noodles. First time in a very long time I've had Ramen Noodles and first time I've ever had the Cheddar Cheese Flavor ones. Came out good, something different. For dessert later tonight a slice of fresh baked Pillsbury Nut Quick Bread topped with a scoop of Breyer's Carb Smart Vanilla Ice Cream.



Orange Roughy with Panko



Ingredients
(4) 4oz. Orange Roughy Fillets

1c. Panko Italian Style Bread Crumbs

Sea Salt and Ground Black Pepper, to taste

1tsp. onion powder

1/2 tsp. garlic powder

1/2 tsp. paprika

1/2 c. Egg Beater’s

1/2 c. Flour

1 1/2Tbs. Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Directions
Rinse fillets and pat dry and season with Sea Salt and Pepper. Press both sides of fillet into flour for a light dusting , shaking off any excess flour. Mix bread crumbs, onion powder, garlic powder, and paprika in a separate bowl. Meanwhile, heat Olive Oil in skillet. Dip floured fillets into Egg Beater’s, allowing excess to drip off. Place fillets, one at a time, in Panko Bread Crumbs, and lightly toss until both sides are covered. Place in oil and saute 4 minutes each side, or until fillet flakes easily with a fork.

Number of Servings: 4




Nissin, Chow Noodles, Cheddar Cheese Flavor


The Nissin noodles come in a microwaveable tray and all you have to do is add water, cook it for about 6 minutes and then mix in the cheese sauce.


Nutrition Facts
Serving Size 50 G
Servings Per Container 2
Amount Per Serving
Calories 230Calories from Fat 90
Total Fat 10 G
Saturated Fat 4.5 G
Trans Fat 0 G
Cholesterol 5 Mg
Sodium 670 Mg 28
Total Carbohydrate 28 G
Dietary Fiber 1 G
Sugars 4 G
Protein 7 G

Fish of the Week - Catfish


Catfishes (order Siluriformes) are a diverse group of ray-finned fish. Named for their prominent barbels, which resemble a cat's whiskers, catfish range in size and behavior from the heaviest and longest, the Mekong giant catfish from Southeast Asia and the second longest, the wels catfish of Eurasia, to detritivores (species that eat dead material on the bottom), and even to a tiny parasitic species commonly called the candiru, Vandellia cirrhosa. There are armour-plated types and also naked types, neither having scales. Despite their name, not all catfish have prominent barbels; members of the Siluriformes order are defined by features of the skull and swimbladder. Catfish are of considerable commercial importance; many of the larger species are farmed or fished for food. Many of the smaller species, particularly the genus Corydoras, are important in the aquarium hobby. Catfish are nocturnal.



Extant catfish species live inland or in coastal waters of every continent except Antarctica. Catfish have
The channel catfish has four pairs of barbels
inhabited all continents at one time or another. Catfish are most diverse in tropical South America, Africa, and Asia. More than half of all catfish species live in the Americas. They are the only ostariophysans that have entered freshwater habitats in Madagascar, Australia, and New Guinea.
They are found in freshwater environments, though most inhabit shallow, running water. Representatives of at least eight families are hypogean (live underground) with three families that are also troglobitic (inhabiting caves). One such species is Phreatobius cisternarum, known to live underground in phreatic habitats. Numerous species from the families Ariidae and Plotosidae, and a
few species from among the Aspredinidae and Bagridae, are found in salt water.
In the United States, catfish species may be known by a variety of slang names, just as mud cat, polliwogs, or chuckleheads. These nicknames are not standardized, so one area may call a Bullhead catfish by the nickname chucklehead, while in another state or region, that nickname refers to the Blue catfish.



Most catfish are bottom feeders. In general, they are negatively buoyant, which means that they will usually sink rather than float due to a reduced gas bladder and a heavy, bony head.[6] Catfish have a variety of body shapes, though most have a cylindrical body with a flattened ventrum to allow for benthic feeding.
A flattened head allows for digging through the substrate as well as perhaps serving as a hydrofoil. Most have a mouth that can expand to a large size and contains no incisiform teeth; catfish generally feed through suction or gulping rather than biting and cutting prey. However, some families, notably Loricariidae and Astroblepidae, have a suckermouth that allows them to fasten themselves to objects in fast-moving water. Catfish also have a maxilla reduced to a support for barbels; this means that they are unable to protrude their mouths as other fish such as carp.
Catfish may have up to four pairs of barbels: nasal, maxillary (on each side of mouth), and two pairs of chin barbels, even though pairs of barbels may be absent depending on the species. Catfish also have chemoreceptors across their entire bodies, which means they "taste" anything they touch and "smell" any chemicals in the water. "In catfish, gustation plays a primary role in the orientation and location of food". Because their barbels and chemoreception are more important in detecting food, the eyes on catfish are generally small. Like other ostariophysans, they are characterized by the presence of a Weberian apparatus. Their well-developed Weberian apparatus and reduced gas bladder allow for improved hearing as well as sound production.
Catfish have no scales; their bodies are often naked. In some species, the mucus-covered skin is used in cutaneous respiration, where the fish breathes through its skin. In some catfish, the skin is covered in bony plates called scutes; some form of body armor appears in various ways within the order. In loricarioids and in the Asian genus Sisor, the armor is primarily made up of one or more rows of free dermal plates. Similar plates are found in large specimens of Lithodoras. These plates may be supported by vertebral processes, as in scoloplacids and in Sisor, but the processes never fuse to the plates or form any external armor. By contrast, in the subfamily Doumeinae (family Amphiliidae) and in hoplomyzontines (Aspredinidae), the armor is formed solely by expanded vertebral processes that form plates. Finally, the lateral armor of doradids, Sisor, and hoplomyzontines consists of hypertrophied lateral line ossicles with dorsal and ventral lamina.

All catfish, except members of Malapteruridae (electric catfish), possess a strong, hollow, bonified leading spine-like ray on their dorsal and pectoral fins. As a defense, these spines may be locked into place so that they stick outwards, which can inflict severe wounds. In several species catfish can use these fin rays to deliver a stinging protein if the fish is irritated. This venom is produced by glandular cells in the epidermal tissue covering the spines. In members of the family Plotosidae, and of the genus Heteropneustes, this protein is so strong it may hospitalize humans, those unfortunate enough to receive a sting; in Plotosus lineatus, the stings may result in death.
Juvenile catfish, like most fish, have relatively large heads, eyes and posterior median fins in comparison to larger, more mature individuals. These juveniles can be readily placed in their families, particularly those with highly derived fin or body shapes; in some cases identification of the genus is possible. As far as known for most catfish, features that are often characteristic of species such as mouth and fin positions, fin shapes, and barbel lengths show little difference between juveniles and adults. For many species, pigmentation pattern is also similar in juveniles and adults. Thus, juvenile catfishes generally resemble and develop smoothly into their adult form without distinct juvenile specializations. Exceptions to this are the ariid catfishes, where the young retain yolk sacs late into juvenile stages, and many pimelodids, which may have elongated barbels and fin filaments or coloration patterns.
Sexual dimorphism is reported in about half of all families of catfish. The modification of the anal fin into an intromittent organ (in internal fertilizers) as well as accessory structures of the reproductive apparatus (in both internal and external fertilizers) have been described in species belonging to 11 different families.



Catfish have one of the greatest ranges in size within a single order of bony fish. Many catfish have a maximum length of under 12 cm. Some of the smallest species of Aspredinidae and Trichomycteridae reach sexual maturity at only 1 centimetre (0.39 in).
The wels catfish, Silurus glanis, is the only native catfish species of Europe, besides the much smaller related Aristotle's catfish found in Greece. Mythology and literature record wels catfish of astounding proportions, yet to be proven scientifically. The average size of the species is about 1.2–1.6 m (3.9–5.2 ft), and fish more than 2 metres (6.6 ft) are very rare. The largest specimens on record measure more than 2.5 metres (8.2 ft) in length and sometimes exceeded 100 kilograms (220 lb).
The largest Ictalurus furcatus, caught in the Missouri River on July 20, 2010, weighed 130 pounds (59 kg). The largest flathead catfish, Pylodictis olivaris, ever caught was in Independence, Kansas, weighing 123 lb 9 oz (56.0 kg). In July 2009, a catfish weighing 193 pounds was caught in the River Ebro, Spain, by an 11-year old British schoolgirl. However, these records pale in comparison to a giant Mekong catfish caught in northern Thailand on May 1, 2005 and reported to the press almost 2 months later that weighed 293 kilograms (650 lb). This is the largest giant Mekong catfish caught since Thai officials started keeping records in 1981. The giant Mekong catfish are not well studied since they live in developing countries and it is quite possible that they can grow even larger.



In many catfish, the humeral process is a bony process extending backward from the pectoral girdle immediately above the base of the pectoral fin. It lies beneath the skin where its outline may be determined by dissecting the skin or probing with a needle.
The retina of catfish are composed of single cones and large rods. Many catfish have a tapetum lucidum which may help enhance photon capture and increase low-light sensitivity. Double cones, though present in most teleosts, are absent from catfish.
The anatomical organization of the testis in catfish is variable among the families of catfish, but the majority of them present fringed testis: Ictaluridae, Claridae, Auchenipteridae, Doradidae, Pimelodidae, and Pseudopimelodidae. In the testes of some species of Siluriformes, organs and structures such as a spermatogenic cranial region and a secretory caudal region are observed, in addition to the presence of seminal vesicles in the caudal region. The total number of fringes and their length are different in the caudal and cranial portions between species. Fringes of the caudal region may present tubules, in which the lumen is filled by secretion and spermatozoa. Spermatocysts are formed from cytoplasmic extensions of Sertoli cells; the release of spermatozoa is allowed by breaking of the cyst walls.
The occurrence of seminal vesicles, in spite of their interspecific variability in size, gross morphology and function, has not been related to the mode of fertilization. They are typically paired, multi-chambered, and connected with the sperm duct, and have been reported to play a glandular and a storage function. Seminal vesicle secretion may include steroids and steroid glucuronides, with hormonal and pheromonal functions, but it appears to be primarily constituted of mucoproteins, acid mucopolysaccharides, and phospholipids.
Fish ovaries may be of two types: gymnovarian or cystovarian. In the first type, the oocytes are released directly into the coelomic cavity and then eliminated. In the second type, the oocytes are conveyed to the exterior through the oviduct. Many catfish are cystovarian in type, including Pseudoplatystoma corruscans, P. fasciatum, Lophiosilurus alexandri, and Loricaria lentiginosa.



Catfish have widely been caught and farmed for food for hundreds of years in Africa, Asia, Europe, and North America. Judgments as to the quality and flavor vary, with some food critics considering catfish as being excellent food, while others dismiss them as watery and lacking in flavor. In Central Europe, catfish were often viewed as a delicacy to be enjoyed on feast days and holidays. Migrants from Europe and Africa to the United States brought along this tradition, and in the Southern United States, catfish is an extremely popular food. The most commonly eaten species in the United States are the channel catfish and the blue catfish, both of which are common in the wild and increasingly widely farmed. Farm-raised catfish became such a staple of the diet of the United States that on June 25, 1987, President Ronald Reagan established National Catfish Day to recognize "the value of farm-raised catfish."
Catfish is eaten in a variety of ways. In Europe it is often cooked in similar ways to carp, but in the United States it is popularly crumbed with cornmeal and fried.
In Indonesia, catfish is usually served grilled in street stalls called warung and eaten with vegetables and soy sauce; the dish is called pecel lele. Catfish can also be eaten with chili sambal as lele penyet (minced catfish). (Lele is the Indonesian word for catfish.)
In Malaysia catfish, called "ikan keli", is fried with spices or grilled and eaten with tamarind and Thai chillies gravy and also is often eaten with steamed rice.
In Bangladesh and the Indian states of Odisha, West Bengal and Assam catfish (locally known as Magur) is eaten as a favored delicacy during the monsoons. Catfish, locally known as thedu or etta in Malayalam, is very famous in the Indian state Kerala. In the inland ponds in Kerala, 2 varieties of catfish is abundant- Muzhi and Kari while "Etta" is a basically a salt water fish. The smaller, slender Kari is notorious for its ability to sting, and Muzhi is much bigger and easy to catch, especially during Monsoon when this seems to literally walk where very little water is present from the rain water. All the catfish are eaten as curry and their extra-large eggs, especially that of Etta, is fried and is a delicacy. It is also believed that catfish meat helps in blood purification. Catfish curry is consumed in these parts to promote faster recovery to patients suffering from fever or other ailments.
In Hungary catfish is often cooked in paprika sauce (Harcsapaprikás) typical of Hungarian cuisine. It is traditionally served with pasta smothered with curd cheese (túrós csusza).
Catfish is high in Vitamin D. Farm-raised catfish contains low levels of omega-3 fatty acids and a much higher proportion of omega-6 fatty acids.
Vietnamese catfish cannot be legally marketed as catfish in the United States, and is subsequently referred to as swai or basa Only fish of the family Ictaluridae may be marketed as catfish in the United States.
As catfish lack scales, they are judged not to be kosher and may not be eaten by observant Jews, some Christians who follow the Torah's food restrictions, and observant Muslims of various schools.


Tuscaloosa Catfish served with corn bread and rice

Catfish are easy to farm in warm climates, leading to inexpensive and safe food at local grocers. About 60% of U.S. farm-raised catfish are grown within a 65-mile (100-km) radius of Belzoni, Mississippi. Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) supports a $450 million/yr aquaculture industry.
Catfish raised in inland tanks or channels are considered safe for the environment, since their waste and disease should be contained and not spread to the wild.
In Asia, many catfish species are important as food. Several walking catfish (Clariidae) and shark catfish (Pangasiidae) species are heavily cultured in Africa and Asia. Exports of one particular shark catfish species from Vietnam, Pangasius bocourti, has met with pressures from the U.S. catfish industry. In 2003, The United States Congress passed a law preventing the imported fish from being labeled as catfish. As a result, the Vietnamese exporters of this fish now label their products sold in the U.S. as "basa fish." Trader Joe's has labeled frozen fillets of Vietnamese Pangasius hypophthalmus as "striper."
There is a large and growing ornamental fish trade, with hundreds of species of catfish, such as Corydoras and armored suckermouth catfish (often called plecos), being a popular component of many aquaria. Other catfish commonly found in the aquarium trade are banjo catfish, talking catfish, and long-whiskered catfish.



Representatives of the genus Ictalurus have been introduced into European waters in the hope of obtaining a sporting and food resource. However, the European stock of American catfishes has not achieved the dimensions of these fish in their native waters, and have only increased the ecological pressure on native European fauna. Walking catfish have also been introduced in the freshwaters of Florida, with the voracious catfish becoming a major alien pest there. Flathead catfish, Pylodictis olivaris, is also a North American pest on Atlantic slope drainages. Pterygoplichthys species, released by aquarium fishkeepers, have also established feral populations in many warm waters around the world.



While the vast majority of catfish are harmless to humans, a few species are known to present some risk. Perhaps the most notorious of these is the candiru, due to the way it is reputed to parasitize the urethra, though there is only one documented case of a candiru attack on a human.
Since 2007, the Goonch catfish has also gained attention following a series of fatal underwater attacks which have been alleged by biologist Jeremy Wade to have been from unusually large goonch.
The Wels catfish has also been reputed to kill humans (especially young children), and while there are no documented cases of fatalities, larger specimens are known to cause serious injuries in rare instances. In addition, other species are reputed to be dangerous to humans as well, but with less definitive evidence.
Many catfish species have “stings” (actually non-venomous in most cases) embedded behind their fins; thus precautions must be taken when handling them.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

To keep the frosting from sticking to your knife as you cut a cake, dip your knife into a glass of cold water
between each cut.

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Fried Crappie w/ Baked Potato, Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread


Today's Menu: Fried Crappie w/ Baked Potato, Green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread



I just got my yearly supply of Lake Okeechobee Crappie, or as they call them there Specks, and the first
bags last week and just couldn't wait no longer to break that second bag out! So easy to fry up and so delicious. Dinner tonight; Fried Crappie w/ Red Potatoes, green Beans, and Whole Grain Bread.




I  seasoned them with Sea Salt and Ground Black Pepper. I then rolled each fillet in Italian Bread Crumbs. I lightly fried them in Canola Oil about 3 minutes per side, golden brown. the taste of Crappie is just incredible! I could eat these at every meal. To go with the Crappie I had a Baked Potato that I seasoned with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn and topped with I Can't Believe It's Not Butter, Del Monte Cut Green Beans and Aunt Millie's Light Whole Grain Bread. For dessert a bowl of Breyer's Carb Smart Vanilla Ice Cream topped with Del Monte No Sugar Added Sliced Peaches.

Buffalo Steaks on a Charcoal Grill


With the Spring here it's time to tune those grills up! When their ready and fired up  what better than a Top Sirloin or any of the other cuts of Buffalo from Wild Idea Buffalo. Below are some basic hints for grilling Buffalo with charcoal. I left the Wild Idea Buffalo web site link at the bottom of the post. Now get ready, Get set, GRILL!




Buffalo Steaks on a Charcoal Grill
Buffalo Top Sirloin

Basic  how-to instructions for cooking steaks on a charcoal grill.

Ideal for: Tenderloin Filets, Ribeyes, New Yorks, Top Sirloin, Sirloin, Bone-in Ribeye, Porter House, T-Bones and Terres Major Filet

 Some swear there’s nothing like a charcoal grill. We say it’s even better with bison. Rub steaks with olive oil, salt, and pepper or the rub you love. Let them rest at room temperature for 2 hours before cooking.

*Use a clean grill.
*Pile coals high in center and allow them to get white-hot.
*Spread coals evenly with tongs, then place oiled grill grate low and close to coals.
*Apply prepared steaks and cover with lid, following cooking times below.


Steak Cooking Times

These guidelines are to medium rare.
Adjust time according to steak’s thickness and personal preference.
We recommend cooking steaks no more than medium.

Thickness First side Second side
1 inch           3  minutes 2 minutes
1½ inch            4 minutes 4 minutes


http://wildideabuffalo.com/

Monday, March 25, 2013

Zatarain’s New Orleans Style Pasta Dinner Shrimp Scampi


Dinner Tonight: Zatarain’s New Orleans Style Pasta Dinner Shrimp Scampi w/ Whole Grain Bread




Rummaging around the freezer last night I found a bag of Kroger Brand Jumbo Shrimp. So for dinner I prepared Zatarain’s New Orleans Style Pasta Dinner Shrimp Scampi w/ Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread.



Using Zatarain’s New Orleans Style Pasta Dinner you can add Chicken, Pork, or Shrimp, but I always go with the Shrimp but I think some Blackened Chicken would be great with this also! I used the Jumbo size Shelled and Tailless Shrimp. I lightly heated the Shrimp for about 3 minutes per side and seasoned them with some Sea Salt, Ground Black Pepper and Zatarains Creole Seasoning. I then cooked the Pasta by the box directions and added in the Shrimp as the Pasta was finishing up. I left the info and details at the bottom of the post on the Zatarain’s. The Scampi came out fantastic! Great flavor, seasoned just right with a bit of heat! Real easy to make and the Zatarains Scampi Pasta is only 110 calories and 21 carbs. The added Shrimp was 120 calories and 0 carbs. I also had a couple of slices of Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread. For a dessert/snack later some Tostito‘s Whole Grain Scoops along with Newman’s Own black Bean and Corn Salsa, which is my new favorite Salsa of choice.





Zatarain’s New Orleans Style Scampi Pasta Dinner Mix

Scampi Pasta Dinner Mix
Introducing Zatarain’s New Orleans Style Pasta Dinners – the fun of pasta with the flavor of New Orleans! Just add chicken, sausage or shrimp to complete this easy-to-prepare dinner your whole family will love. And you know it has to be good because it’s from Zatarain’s…a New Orleans tradition since 1889.

Product Details

Add meat to make a complete meal. Serves 5. This easy-to-prepare dinner mix has just the right blend of ingredients for a great tasting, authentic New Orleans style meal. Zatarain’s has been the leader in authentic New Orleans style food since 1889. So when you want great flavor, Jazz It Up with Zatarain’s! With Zatarain’s New Orleans Style Pasta Dinners you can enjoy the fun of pasta and the authentic flavor of New Orleans! Just add chicken, hamburger or shrimp to complete this easy-to-prepare dinner your whole family will love.

Directions

All You Need Is: 2 cups water; 3 tbsp margarine, 1 pound of chicken, sausage or shrimp. Range Top: 1. Brown 1 lb precut (diced) chicken, sausage or shrimp (When shrimp is used, reduce water by 1/4 cup and add the shrimp after the first 5 minutes of cooking. Zatarain’s Scampi Pasta Dinner Mix tastes great even when prepared without meat or seafood.) in a two-quart saucepan. 2. Stir in 2 cups cold water, 3 tbsp butter or margarine, and Zatarain’s Scampi Pasta Dinner Mix. Blend Thoroughly. Bring to a boil. 3. Stir, reduce heat, cover and simmer for 15 minutes. Stir occasionally. 4. Remove from heat and let stand 5 minutes. Sauce will thicken as it stands. Stir before serving. Microwave: 1. In a two-quart microwave-safe bowl, cook 1 lb precut (diced) chicken, sausage or shrimp (When shrimp is used, reduce water by 1/4 cup and add the shrimp after the first 5 minutes of cooking. Zatarain’s Scampi Pasta Dinner Mix tastes great even when prepared without meat or seafood.) 3-5 minutes on High or until cooked. 2. Stir in 2 cups water, 3 tbsp butter or margarine and Zatarain’s Scampi Pasta Dinner Mix. Blend thoroughly. 3. Microwave uncovered on High for 15 to 17 minutes. Stir occasionally. 4. Let stand for 5 minutes. Sauce will thicken as it stands. Stir before serving. Caution: Cook time may vary depending on the power of the microwave oven.

Nutrition Facts

Serving size: 1 cup
Servings per container: 5
Nutrient Qty %DV
Calories 110
Calories from Fat 10
Total Fat 1 g 1%
Sodium 400 mg 17%
Total Carbohydrate 21 g 7%
Sugars 1 g
Protein 4 g
Vitamin A 4%
Iron 6%
Is or Contains Flavor
Niacin 8%
Riboflavin 40%
Thiamine 35%



http://www.zatarains.com/Products/Pasta-Dinner-Mixes/Scampi-Pasta-Dinner-Mix.aspx

Kitchen Hint of the Day!


If a cake recipe calls for flouring the bake pan, use some of the dry cake mix instead. The cake will absorb the mix, and you won't have a floury mess on the outside when the cake is done.

One of America's Favorites - Garlic

A basket of garlic bulbs

Allium sativum, commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion genus, Allium. Its close relatives include the onion, shallot, leek, chive, and rakkyo. With a history of human use of over 7,000 years, garlic is native to central Asia, and has long been a staple in the Mediterranean region, as well as a frequent seasoning in Asia, Africa, and Europe. It was known to Ancient Egyptians, and has been used for both culinary and medicinal purposes.



According to Zohary and Hopf, "A difficulty in the identification of its wild progenitor is the sterility of the cultivars", though it is thought to be descended from the species Allium longicuspis, which grows wild in central and southwestern Asia. Allium sativum grows in the wild in areas where it has become naturalized. The "wild garlic", "crow garlic", and "field garlic" of Britain are members of the species Allium ursinum, Allium vineale, and Allium oleraceum, respectively. In North America, Allium vineale (known as "wild garlic" or "crow garlic") and Allium canadense, known as "meadow garlic" or "wild garlic" and "wild onion", are common weeds in fields. One of the best-known "garlics", the so-called elephant garlic, is actually a wild leek (Allium ampeloprasum), and not a true garlic. Single clove garlic (also called pearl or solo garlic) originated in the Yunnan province of China.



There are a number of garlics with Protected Geographical Status in Europe; these include:
Aglio Rosso di Nubia (Red Garlic of Nubia) from Nubia-Paceco, Provincia di Trapani, Sicily, Italy
*Aglio Bianco Polesano from Veneto, Italy (PDO)
*Aglio di Voghiera from Ferrara, Emilia-Romagna, Italy (PDO)
*Ail blanc de Lomagne from Lomagne in the Gascony area of France (PGI)
*Ail de la Drôme from Drôme in France (PGI)
*Ail rose de Lautrec a rose/pink garlic from Lautrec in France (PGI)
*Ajo Morado de las Pedroñeras a rose/pink garlic from Las Pedroñeras in Spain (PGI)



Within the species, Allium sativum, there are also two main subspecies or varieties.
*Allium sativum var. ophioscorodon Döll, called Ophioscorodon, or hard necked garlic, includes porcelain garlics, rocambole garlic, and purple stripe garlics. It is sometimes considered to be a separate species, Allium ophioscorodon G.Don.
*Allium sativum var. sativum, or soft-necked garlic, includes artichoke garlic, silverskin garlic, and creole garlic.
Bulb garlic is available in many forms, including fresh, frozen, dried, fermented (black garlic) and shelf stable products (in tubes or jars). In addition, see Culinary uses for other edible parts of the garlic plant.



Garlic is easy to grow and can be grown year-round in mild climates. While sexual propagation of garlic is indeed possible, nearly all of the garlic in cultivation is propagated asexually, by planting individual cloves in the ground. In cold climates, cloves are planted in the fall, about six weeks before the soil freezes, and harvested in late spring. The cloves must be planted at minimum 4 inches underground to prevent freeze/thaw which causes mold or white rot Garlic plants are usually very hardy, and are not attacked by many pests or diseases. Garlic plants are said to repel rabbits and moles. Two of the major pathogens that attack garlic are nematodes and white rot disease, which remain in the soil indefinitely after the ground has become infected. Garlic also can suffer from pink root, a typically nonfatal disease that stunts the roots and turns them pink or red.
Garlic plants can be grown closely together, leaving enough space for the bulbs to mature, and are easily grown in containers of sufficient depth. Garlic does well in loose, dry, well drained soils in sunny locations, and is hardy throughout USDA climate zones 4 - 9. When selecting garlic for planting, it is important to pick large heads from which to separate cloves. Large cloves, along with proper spacing in the planting bed, will also improve head size. Garlic plants prefer to grow in a soil with a high organic material content, but are capable of growing in a wide range of soil conditions and pH levels.
There are different types or subspecies of garlic, most notably hardneck garlic and softneck garlic. The latitude where the garlic is grown affects the choice of type as garlic can be day-length sensitive. Hardneck garlic is generally grown in cooler climates; softneck garlic is generally grown closer to the equator.
Garlic scapes are removed to focus all the garlic's energy into bulb growth. The scapes can be eaten raw or cooked.



Garlic is grown globally, but China is by far the largest producer of garlic, with approximately 10.5 million tonnes (23 billion pounds) grown annually, accounting for over 77% of world output. India (4.1%) and South Korea (2%) follow, with Egypt and Russia (1.6%) tied in fourth place and the United States (where garlic is grown in every state except for Alaska) in sixth place (1.4%). This leaves 16% of global garlic production in countries that each produce less than 2% of global output. Much of the garlic production in the United States is centered in Gilroy, California, which calls itself the "garlic capital of the world".





Garlic being crushed using a garlic press


Garlic is widely used around the world for its pungent flavor as a seasoning or condiment.
The garlic plant's bulb is the most commonly used part of the plant. With the exception of the single clove types, garlic bulbs are normally divided into numerous fleshy sections called cloves. Garlic cloves are used for consumption (raw or cooked) or for medicinal purposes. They have a characteristic pungent, spicy flavor that mellows and sweetens considerably with cooking.
Other parts of the garlic plant are also edible. The leaves and flowers (bulbils) on the head (spathe) are sometimes eaten. They are milder in flavor than the bulbs, and are most often consumed while immature and still tender. Immature garlic is sometimes pulled, rather like a scallion, and sold as "green garlic". When green garlic is allowed to grow past the "scallion" stage, but not permitted to fully mature, it may produce a garlic "round", a bulb like a boiling onion, but not separated into cloves like a mature bulb. Additionally, the immature flower stalks (scapes) of the hardneck and elephant types are sometimes marketed for uses similar to asparagus in stir-fries.
Inedible or rarely eaten parts of the garlic plant include the "skin" and root cluster. The papery, protective layers of "skin" over various parts of the plant are generally discarded during preparation for most culinary uses, though in Korea immature whole heads are sometimes prepared with the tender skins intact. The root cluster attached to the basal plate of the bulb is the only part not typically considered palatable in any form.
Garlic is a fundamental component in many or most dishes of various regions, including eastern Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Middle East, northern Africa, southern Europe, and parts of South and Central America. The flavor varies in intensity and aroma with the different cooking methods. It is often paired with onion, tomato, or ginger. The parchment-like skin is much like the skin of an onion, and is typically removed before using in raw or cooked form. An alternative is to cut the top off the bulb, coat the cloves by dribbling olive oil (or other oil-based seasoning) over them, and roast them in an oven. Garlic softens and can be extracted from the cloves by squeezing the (root) end of the bulb, or individually by squeezing one end of the clove. In Korea, heads of garlic are fermented at high temperature; the resulting product, called black garlic, is sweet and syrupy, and is now being sold in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia.

Garlic may be applied to different kinds of bread to create a variety of classic dishes, such as garlic bread, garlic toast, bruschetta, crostini and canapé.
Oils can be flavored with garlic cloves. These infused oils are used to season all categories of vegetables, meats, breads and pasta.
In some cuisines, the young bulbs are pickled for three to six weeks in a mixture of sugar, salt, and spices. In eastern Europe, the shoots are pickled and eaten as an appetizer.
Immature scapes are tender and edible. They are also known as "garlic spears", "stems", or "tops". Scapes generally have a milder taste than the cloves. They are often used in stir frying or braised like asparagus.[16] Garlic leaves are a popular vegetable in many parts of Asia. The leaves are cut, cleaned, and then stir-fried with eggs, meat, or vegetables.
Mixing garlic with egg yolks and olive oil produces aioli. Garlic, oil, and a chunky base produce skordalia. Blending garlic, almond, oil, and soaked bread produces ajoblanco.
Garlic powder has a different taste from fresh garlic. If used as a substitute for fresh garlic, 1/8 teaspoon of garlic powder is equivalent to one clove of garlic.



Domestically, garlic is stored warm [above 18 °C (64 °F)] and dry to keep it dormant (so it does not sprout). It is traditionally hung; softneck varieties are often braided in strands called plaits or grappes. Peeled cloves may be stored in wine or vinegar in the refrigerator. Commercially, garlic is stored at 0 °C (32 °F), in a dry, low-humidity environment. Garlic will keep longer if the tops remain attached.
Garlic is often kept in oil to produce flavored oil; however, the practice requires measures to be taken to prevent the garlic from spoiling. Untreated garlic kept in oil can support the growth of Clostridium botulinum which causes the deadly botulism illness; refrigeration will not assure the safety of garlic kept in oil. To reduce this risk, the oil should be refrigerated and used within one week. Commercially prepared oils are widely available. Manufacturers add acids and/or other chemicals to eliminate the risk of botulism in their products. Two outbreaks of botulism related to garlic stored in oil have been reported.
In 1961, Chester Lilley from Kent in England was the first person to transform garlic into a pill form for storage. Although not widely accepted at the time for culinary uses, a capsulate solution for both the storage and simple dosing of garlic has become commonplace.

Sunday, March 24, 2013

Baked Barbecued Country-Style Ribs w/ Mashed Potatoes, Sugar Snap Peas,...


Dinner Tonight: Baked Barbecued Country-Style Ribs w/ Mashed Potatoes, Sugar Snap Peas, and Whole Grain Bread




Rain, sleet, and snow take your pick around here today, it's switching back and forth all morning. Late afternoon it's turned to all snow. Come on Springtime Weather! I picked up a package of Country Style Pork Ribs at the store yesterday so for dinner I tried a new recipe with them, Baked Barbecued Country-Style Ribs. For dinner; Baked Barbecued Country-Style Ribs w/ Mashed Potatoes, Sugar Snap Peas, and Whole Grain Bread. Need an easy and delicious recipe for Country Style Pork Ribs or for other Pork cuts, you have to try this one!



First time try with this recipe for the Country Style Pork Ribs, and will not be the last! To prepare I needed; 1 1/2 to 2 pounds Boneless Country-Style Ribs, 3 teaspoons Cajun Seasoning, 1/4 teaspoon Garlic Powder, 1/2 teaspoon Onion Powder, 1/2 teaspoon Chili Powder, 1/2 teaspoon Ground Cumin, 1 teaspoon Dried Cilantro, and 3/4 cup JB's Fat Boy Haug Waush Barbecue Sauce. You can tell by these ingredients this was going to be delicious, and it was! I started by washing ribs and patting them dry. Combined all the seasoning and mixed. Rub the seasoning mixture over the ribs. Line a shallow baking pan with foil; oil or spray with nonstick cooking spray. Arrange ribs on the foil. Cover with another piece of foil and bake at 325° for 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until very tender. Remove the top piece of foil and brush with Barbecue Sauce; bake uncovered for about 15 minutes longer, or broil for about 5 minutes. The combination of all the spices make a fantastic flavor for the Pork! A little heat and a little sweetness then with the added JB's Fatboy Haug Waush BBQ Sauce, PERFECT! The Pork came out flavorful and moist, another keeper recipe!




For side dishes I had Bob Evans Mashed Potatoes, Walmart Marketside Sugar Snap Peas, and Aunt Millie's Whole Grain Bread topped with I Can't Believe It's Not Butter. The Mashed Potatoes and Sugar Snap Peas are both prepared by heating in the microwave. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding.


 

Baked Barbecued Country-Style Ribs

Ingredients:

1 1/2 to 2 pounds Boneless Country-Style Ribs
3 teaspoons Cajun Seasoning
1/4 teaspoon Garlic Powder
1/2 teaspoon Onion Powder
1/2 teaspoon Chili Powder
1/2 teaspoon Ground Cumin
1 teaspoon Dried Cilantro
3/4 cup JB's Fat Boy Haug Waush Barbecue Sauce


Preparation:

Wash ribs and pat dry. Combine all the seasoning and mix. Rub seasoning mixture over the ribs. Line a shallow baking pan with foil; oil or spray with nonstick cooking spray. Arrange ribs on the foil. Cover with another piece of foil and bake at 325° for 1 hour and 15 minutes, or until very tender. Remove the top piece of foil and brush with barbecue sauce; bake uncovered for about 15 minutes longer, or broil for about 5 minutes.

Kitchen Hint of the day!

For the best tasting cakes ever, always bring the eggs, milk, and butter to room temperature before you make your batter.

Soybean Meal Peptides Could Stop Colon, Liver And Lung Cancer Growth


Soybean Meal Peptides Could Stop Colon, Liver And Lung Cancer Growth


The bean used to make tofu could also have powerful anti-cancer properties, according to a new study published in the journal Food Research International.

Researchers from the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville found that peptides from soybean meal -- the leftover product after oil is taken out of soybean seeds -- are able to stop the growth of colon cancer, liver cancer and lung cancer cells in a lab setting.

"Dose response showed that the peptides had significant inhibitory effect at higher concentrations … and gradually decreased with decreased dosage," the researchers wrote in the study, meaning that the higher the dose of the soybean seed peptides, the greater the effect on the cancer cells.

Researchers specifically reported that the peptides stopped colon cancer cell growth by 73 percent and liver cancer cell growth by 70 percent. And lung cancer cell growth was stopped by 68 percent.

Another natural compound that could potentially stop the growth of cancer? The red grape compound resveratrol, which was shown in a lab setting to stop breast cancer cell growth because of its effect on estrogen.

And a compound in broccoli, called sulforaphane, seems to kill leukemia cells in a lab setting without having any detrimental effects on healthy cells.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/24/soybean-cancer-colon-liver-lung-meal-peptides_n_2916645.html?utm_hp_ref=@food123

Saturday, March 23, 2013

Velveeta/Kraft Dinners Chili Cheese Mac Velveeta Cheesy Skillets w/…


Dinner Tonight: Velveeta/Kraft Dinners Chili Cheese Mac Velveeta Cheesy Skillets w/ Whole Grain Bread






Come on warm Spring time weather! Beautiful sunny but cool day out today but as usual starting tomorrow and going through part of Monday SNOW! How much, I've heard anywhere from 3" to 8" inches. Come on Mother Nature show us a little love! Anyway for dinner I prepared Velveeta/Kraft Cheesy Skillets Dinner Chili Cheese Mac, using Jennie - O Extra Lean Ground Turkey and added 1 can of Joan of Arc Light Red Kidney Beans.





As in all the Chessy Skillet Dinners the kit includes: Pasta, Velveeta Cheese Sauce, and Seasoning pack. All I had to do was add the 2 cups of water and 1 lb. of Ground Turkey, and 1 can of Joan of Arc Light Red Kidney Beans. I used Jennie – O Extra Lean Ground Turkey. Using the Extra Lean Ground Turkey instead of the Ground Beef you can lower the calorie count by anywhere from 60 – 80 calories! As I browned the Turkey I added Sea Salt, Pepper, and Ground Smoked Cumin for seasoning. It’s ready in about 10 minutes. I then add 2 cups of water, the seasoning and pasta. Simmer for 10 – 12 minutes and add the Velveeta Cheese and your ready for dinner. I’ll leave the instructions at the end of the post. It’s 380 calories and 28 carbs but you can lower the calorie count by using the Ground Turkey as stated above. The Ultimate Cheeseburger Dinner is very good but i think this is my new favorite. I really like the Chili Seasoning! Another one pan quick, easy, and delicious Velveeta/Kraft Dinner! I also had a couple of slices of Aunt Millie’s Light Whole Grain Bread. For dessert/snack later a 100 Calorie Mini Bag of Jolly Time Pop Corn.... and to all a good night!



 
Velveeta/Kraft Dinners Chili Cheese Mac Velveeta Cheesy Skillets
Kraft Dinners Chili Cheese Mac Velveeta Cheesy Skillets features creamy cheese sauce with pasta and premium seasonings. Make your family smile with ooey gooey Velveeta Cheesy Skillets.

Kraft Dinners Chili Cheese Mac Velveeta Cheesy Skillets:
Made with real cheddar cheese
Just add ground beef
Makes about 5 servings
Ready in about 20 minutes
Velveeta Cheesy Skillets Chili Cheese Mac

Ingredients:
* 1 LB. Ground Beef or Ground Turkey (Extra Lean)
* Sea Salt, Pepper, Cilantro, Ground Smoked Cumin to taste; Optional
* 2 Cups Water
* 1 Velveeta Cheesy Skillets Dinner Kit/Chili Cheese Mac

Instructions:
* Brown and season 1 LB. Ground Turkey in large skillet. Drain
* Add 2 cups water, seasoning and pasta. Bring to a boil. Reduce Heat.
* Cover, Simmer and stir often until most of water is gone about 11-13 minutes. Remove from heat.
* Add Cheese from Velveeta Cheese Pouch. Stir in Cheese Sauce and serve
Nutrition Facts
Velveeta – Cheesy Skillets- Chili Cheese Mac W/ 90% Lean Beef
Calories 380
Total Fat 16 g
Saturated 6 g
Polyunsaturated 0 g
Monounsaturated 0 g
Trans 1 g Protein 27 g
Cholesterol 75 mg
Sodium 830 mg
Potassium 0 mg
Total Carbs 28 g
Dietary Fiber 2 g
Sugars 5 g

Diabetic Easter Recipes


With Easter getting closer I thought I would leave a couple of Diabetic Friendly recipe ideas from the web site of Diabetic Gourmet. If you have never visited the site you need too. It's packed full of diabetic friendly recipes!   http://diabeticgourmet.com/recipes/Holidays_and_Special_Occasions/Easter/






Adobo-Crusted Lamb Loin Chops

Makes 4 servings

Ingredients

1 tablespoon fennel seed
1 tablespoon cumin seed
2 teaspoons coriander seed
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
2 teaspoons cracked pepper
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
2 teaspoons minced garlic
2 teaspoons dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 teaspoons lime zest
8 lamb loin chops, 1-inch thick
4 tablespoons olive oil
Directions

In a dry skillet, toast fennel, cumin, coriander, rosemary and pepper for a few minutes until aromatic; let cool and grind coarsely in a spice grinder or blender.
Stir in salt, garlic, oregano, thyme and lime zest.
Rub both sides of each lamb chop with about a tablespoon of the spice mixture; cover and let stand for at least 1 hour.
Preheat oven to 400F.
Heat two oven-proof large skillets over medium-high heat; add 2 tablespoons of olive oil to each pan and bring just to the smoking point.
Place four lamb chops in each hot pan and sear for 5 minutes; turn lamb to sear the second side for an additional 2 minutes.
Place the pans into the oven and continue to cook the chops for 5 to 10 minutes or until lamb is cooked to your liking.
Nutritional Information (Per Serving)
Calories: 316
Protein: 25 g
Sodium: 307 mg
Cholesterol: 80 mg
Fat: 22 g
Dietary Fiber: 2 g
Carbohydrates: 4 g



Apricot-Glazed Ham

Serves 20

Ingredients

5 pound fully cooked whole boneless ham
1/3 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon cloves
2/3 cup apricot nectar
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Directions

Place ham on rack in a shallow roasting pan. Bake, uncovered, in a 325 degree F. oven for 1 1/4 hours or until meat thermometer registers 140 degrees F. (about 15-18 minutes per pound.)
For the glaze, in a small saucepan combine brown sugar, cornstarch, nutmeg and cloves. Stir in apricot nectar and lemon juice. Cook over medium heat until thickened and bubbly, stirring constantly.
Brush ham with glaze. Continue baking 15-20 minutes more, brushing occasionally with glaze.
Nutritional Information (Per Serving)
Calories: 208
Protein: 25 g
Sodium: 1572 mg
Cholesterol: 64 mg
Fat: 9 g
Saturated Fat: 3 g
Dietary Fiber: 0 g
Carbohydrates: 6 g


http://diabeticgourmet.com/recipes/Holidays_and_Special_Occasions/Easter/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

You've had a hectic day, but luckily you had a frozen casserole in the freezer! Unfortunately, you were in such a rush you have no idea how long ago you popped it in the oven. To tell if your casserole is heated through, insert a butter knife into the center, lift it out, then slowly and carefully press it to your wrist. If the knife is hot, you'll know the casserole is too.

Friday, March 22, 2013

Chili and Cheese Nachos w/ Side of Celery and Sliced Carrot Sticks


Dinner Tonight: Chili and Cheese Nachos w/ Side of Celery and Sliced Carrot Sticks





It's been an afternoon of March Maddness (College Basketball) and it's going to be an evening of the same. So what better than some Chili and Cheese Nachos to eat while watching the games this evening. Quick and easy to prepare so I won't miss any action and delicious and filling for a meal sometimes.


I used Tostito’s Whole Grain Scoops for the chips, 2 can Campbells Firehouse Chili w/ Beans, 1 small can of Sliced Black Olives, sliced Jalapenos, and Kraft 2% Pizza Cheese. Just layer in a baking dish and bake at 400 degrees until the chips are warmed and cheese is melted. I think the Campbell’s Firehouse Chili makes the Nachos. It’s a seasoned just right, thick and just enough heat to make it perfect! I also sliced up some Celery Sticks and Carrots along with some Litehouse Lite ranch Vegetable Dip. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Chocolate Swirl Frozen Yogurt.






Litehouse Lite Ranch Veggie Dip

Lite Ranch Veggie Dip
Our favorite mouth-watering Ranch Dip with almost half the calories and fat. Only 2 grams carbohydrates,no msg, and no preservatives





Campbell’s Chunky Firehouse – Hot & Spicy Beef & Bean Chili

Directions
Stove: do not add water. heat, stirring occasionally. Microwave: do not add water. heat, covered, in medium microwaveable bowl or 2 individual microwaveable bowls on high 2 1/2 to 3 minutes. careful, leave in microwave 1 minute, then stir.

Also available as a microwavable bowl

Nutrition Facts*
Amount Per Serving (serving size) = 1 cup (240 mL)
Calories 220
Fat Calories 50
Total Fat 6g
Sat. Fat 3g
Trans Fat 0g
Cholesterol 30mg
Sodium 870mg
Total Carb. 25g
Dietary Fiber 7g
Sugars 8g
Protein 16g

% Daily Values**
Vitamin A 10%
Vitamin C 2%
Calcium 6%
Iron 15%
* The nutrition information contained in this list of Nutrition Facts is based on our current data. However, because the data may change from time to time, this information may not always be identical to the nutritional label information of products on shelf.
** % Daily Values (DV) are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

Ow! If you or your child bites into a piece of pizza that's too hot to eat, reach for a glass of milk. Milk will soothe the roof of your mouth better than cold water because the protein in milk will create a protective film over your burns. Now let the pizza cool a bit before you take another bite.

MyPlate-Inspired: Our Best Dinner Recipes


It's all about the MyPlate-Inspired Dinner Recipes. Some healthy and great dinner ideas and recipes from http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/  To read the entire article and see some healthy dinner ideas just click the link at the end of the post. Have a good weekend everyone!







MyPlate-Inspired: Our Best Dinner Recipes
By Caitlyn Diimig


Diabetic Living is working with the Partnership for a Healthier America and USDA's MyPlate to give anyone looking for healthier options access to delicious recipes that will help them create healthy, tasty plates. For more information about creating a healthy plate, visit choosemyplate.gov. Find recipes at Pinterest.com/MyPlateRecipes.


MyPlate-Inspired Recipes
Finding healthy recipes for dinner your family will love can be a challenge. That's why Diabetic Living has teamed up with the Partnership for a Healthier America and the USDA's MyPlate program to offer families delicious options for healthier eating. From takeout-inspired recipes to easy sandwiches to whip up on a busy weeknight, all of your favorites are here!


Kung Pao Chicken
Bok choy and red chile peppers get upgraded with the tangy flavors of low-sodium soy sauce, fresh ginger, and toasted sesame oil. This meal is a great way to sneak in veggies, while enjoying your favorite takeout without the added calories, fat, and sodium.


http://www.diabeticlivingonline.com/diabetic-recipes/popular/myplate-dinner-recipes/?sssdmh=dm17.657467&esrc=nwdlo031913

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Baked Buffalo Chicken Breast Sandwich w/ Baked Crinkle Fries


Dinner Tonight: Baked Buffalo Chicken Breast Sandwich w/ Baked Crinkle Fries




What better way to heat up a cooold and windy day than some Baked Buffalo Chicken Breast! I love this recipe for Chicken Breasts. The Kroger Wing Sauce gives it fantastic flavor with nice heat, not over powering but you know there's Wing Sauce on it! For dinner I prepared Baked Buffalo Chicken Breast Sandwich w/ Baked Crinkle Fries.



To prepare my Chicken I needed 2 (4 ounce) Boneless Skinless Chicken Breasts, 6 Tablespoons favorite Wing Sauce (I used Kroger Wing Sauce), and 1/2 Cup Litehouse Lite Bleu Cheese Dressing/Dip, and Aunt Millie's Light Whole Grain Buns . To start I Preheated the oven to 400°F. Then Sprayed large non-stick skillet and 8×8″ baking dish with Pam cooking spray. Added the chicken to skillet & cooked 4-5 minutes each side until browned. Placed the chicken in dish and poured Wing Sauce over chicken and baked (uncovered) 20 minutes. I served it on an Aunt Millie's Light Whole Grain Bun and topped it with some Litehouse Light Bleu Chesse Dressing. I made 2 Chicken Breasts 1 for dinner and 1 for lunch tomorrow.



To go with the Baked Buffalo Chicken Breasts I baked some Ore Ida Crinkle Fries. For dessert later a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.




Baked Buffalo Chicken Breasts

Ingredients
2 (4 ounce) Boneless Skinless Chicken Breasts
Sea Salt and Black Pepper, to taste
4 Tablespoons favorite Wing Sauce (I used Kroger Wing Sauce)
1/2 Cup Lighthouse Lite Bleu Cheese Dressing/Dip
Aunt Millie's Light Whole Grain Buns


Directions
Preheat oven to 400°F.
Spray large non-stick skillet and 8×8″ baking dish with cooking spray.
Season Chicken and add chicken to skillet & cook 4-5 minutes each side until browned. Place chicken in dish and...
Pour Wing Sauce over chicken and bake (uncovered) 25 minutes.
Serve with Bleu Cheese Dressing and Serve on Aunt Millie's Light Whole Grain Bun.

Wild Idea Buffalo Recipe of the Week - 4 Bean Bison Chili


Another god one from the web site of  http://wildideabuffalo.com/

4 Bean Bison Chili


Serves 10
If you are looking for a great chili to bring to your next cook-off or football game, then try this recipe and let the compliments roll in. Even better the second (or third) day – if there’s leftovers.

INGREDIENTS:

2   pounds ground bison
2   tablespoons olive oil
1   onion, chopped
2   tablespoons fresh garlic, chopped
2   tablespoons cumin
2½    tablespoons chili powder
½ tablespoon oregano
½ tablespoon thyme
2   teaspoons coriander
½  teaspoon each smoked paprika and cayenne
1   tablespoon black pepper
2   teaspoons salt
1   Quart stewed tomatoes
1   Quart tomato sauce
8     golden pepperoncini, diced + juices
1   15oz can each: butter beans, black beans, kidney beans, and pinto beans, (drained – but not rinsed)
1    lemon, juiced
2   cups water



PREPARATION:

1.)  Mix all dry spices together.
2.)  In heavy stew pot, over medium high heat, heat olive oil.
3.)  Add Wild Idea bison meat, crumbling into small pieces.  Lightly brown, stirring constantly for 4 minutes.
4.)  Add onion, garlic and seasonings. Continue to brown, stirring occasionally for 10 minutes.
5.)  Add remaining ingredients and bring to a full boil. Reduce heat and simmer uncovered for ½ to 1 hour, or until desired thickness is achieved.

Adjust seasoning to taste. Garnish with fresh lime or lemon wedges, fresh chopped cilantro, sour cream, or grated cheddar cheese. Serve with Cheesy Jalapeño Corn Bread, recipe included with purchase, upon request.

 http://wildideabuffalo.com/2012/4-bean-bison-chili-2/

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

Chopping your own garlic instead of buying it pre-minced can be a real pain but a huge money saver. Use this simple trick to make it a little easier on yourself: microwave the garlic for about eight seconds to make it easy to peel. Once the cloves are peeled, drizzle a tiny amount of oil over them to make them less sticky when your trying to chop them.

Wednesday, March 20, 2013

Fried Walleye Fillet w/ Long Grain and Wild Rice, Carrots, and Whole Grain Bread


Dinner Tonight: Fried Walleye Fillet w/ Long Grain and Wild Rice, Carrots, and Whole Grain Bread




I had tried for several years to get a prosthetic leg to work but was unsuccessful due to my stub was cut so short. But I'm always checking the news and web sites for new developments on legs. I've now found out through a routine exam and some x-rays it will be impossible for me to wear a prosthetic leg. I had a right hip replacement about 4 or 5 years ago due to arthritis. After doing some checking they found that my left hip is in terrible shape with arthritis. And because my left leg femur bone is cut so short they can't preform a hip replacement and the hip is in such bad shape it would never support the wear and tear of normal use of the leg. So in a wheelchair I'll remain but I'm Cancer Free and able to get around be it by a walker or wheelchair. So life goes on as they say, "The world is what you make of it. If it doesn’t fit you make alterations.” On a more positive note for dinner tonight I prepared; Fried Walleye Fillet w/ Long and Wild Rice, Carrots, and Whole Grain Bread.



I had one Walleye fillet leftover from the Meijer that i had purchased a while back. To prepare it i seasoned it with McCormick Grinder Sea Salt and Black Peppercorn. I then rolled it in Progresso Italian Style Bread Crumbs and pan fried it in Canola Oil about 4 minutes per side, came out golden brown. I just love the taste of Walleye.



To go with my Walleye I prepared Long Grain and Wild Rice, Mini Carrots, and Aunt Millie's Light Whole Grain Bread. The Rice was Uncle Ben's Long Grain and Wild Rice. It comes in a microwavable Bag, just heat for 90 seconds and serve. I boiled the Mini Carrots, about 20 minutes until fork tender. For dessert later a Healthy Choice Chocolate Swirl Frozen Yogurt Cup.





UNCLE BEN’S® Long Grain & Wild Rice

UNCLE BEN’S® Long Grain & Wild Original Recipe helps make an everyday meal more special. With a unique blend of wild and long grain rice and 23 all natural herbs and seasonings, it is sure to dress up your meal. It's a delicious and trusted family favorite!

Nutritional Claims & Product Benefits:

Cholesterol Free
0g Trans Fat
No Saturated Fat
Excellent Source of Folic Acid


Nutrition Facts
Uncle Ben's Ready Rice - Long Grain and Wild -- Microwave In A Pouch
Servings: 1 Cup  
Calories 190 Sodium 630 mg
Total Fat 2 g Potassium 270 mg
Saturated 0 g Total Carbs 39 g
Polyunsaturated 0 g Dietary Fiber 2 g
Monounsaturated 0 g Sugars 1 g
Trans 0 g Protein 5 g
Cholesterol 0 mg


http://www.unclebens.com/?CID=paidsearch

Kitchen Hint of the Day!

Cooking Thanksgiving dinner and your vegetables turned to mush? Simply add some herbs along with tomato sauce or cream. Then top with cheese and/or bread crumbs and stick in the oven for 30 minutes. Your family is sure to be impressed with your new recipe for "vegetables gratin"!

Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Country Fried Veal Cubed Steak w/ Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, and Garlic Knot Bread


Dinner Tonight: Country Fried Veal Cubed Steak w/ Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, and Garlic Knot Bread






The Groundhog lied! He said an early Spring. If you step outside today you can tell it's not Spring, the wind is bone - chilling! From what they are predicting it's going to be this way all week. The first day of Spring is Wednesday so we'll wait and see. For dinner I had a nice size Veal Cubed Steak in the freezer that I let thaw overnight in the fridge. So for dinner I prepared Country Fried Veal Cubed Steak w/ Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, and Garlic Knot Bread. I also made a bit of Brown Gravy out of the Veal drippings.



To make the Counry Fried Veal Cubed Steak I needed the following;  Veal Cubed Steak, Sea Salt, freshly Ground Black Pepper, 1/2 cup All-Purpose Flour, 1 whole egg, beaten or 1/4 Cup Egg Beater's, Vegetable Oil or Extra Virgin Olive Oil, 1 cup Low Sodium Beef Broth, 1/4 cup 2% Milk, and 1/2 teaspoon Dried Thyme leaves. Season the piece of veal on both sides with the salt and pepper. Place the flour into a pie pan. Place the egg into a separate pie pan. Dredge the meat on both sides in the Flour. Then follow by the egg and finally in the flour again. Place the meat onto a plate and allow it to sit for 10 to 15 minutes before cooking. Place enough of the oil to cover the bottom of a 12-inch slope-sided skillet and set over medium-high heat. Once the oil begins to shimmer, add the veal. Cook each piece on both sides until golden brown, approximately 4 to 6 minutes per side. Remove the steaks to a plate and cover tightly with foil. Set aside.


Remove all but one tablespoon of oil from the pan you cooked the veal in--don't clean the pan because you want all those brown bits. Whisk in one heaping tablespoon of the flour left over from the dredging. Add the beef broth and deglaze the pan. Whisk until the gravy comes to a boil and begins to thicken, about 3 minutes. Add the milk and thyme and whisk until the gravy coats the back of a spoon, approximately 5 to 10 minutes. Season to taste, but you probably wont need it. Serve the gravy over the steak. This came out too good! The Veal with Seasoning and Flour Crust is perfect. Along with the Gravy topping, too good! I left the recipe at the end of the post, the recipe is for 2 Veal Cubed Steaks.



For sides to go with the Veal I prepare Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans, and Baked Garlic Knot Bread. the Mashed Potatoes were Bob Evan's Brand, just heat in the microwave and their ready. I used Del Monte Cut green Beans (Single Serving Can). For this just heat in a small sauce pan until heated. The Garlic Knot Bread was from the Walmart Bakery, just heat on 425 degrees for about 6 minutes and done. For dessert later tonight a Jello Sugar Free Dark Chocolate Pudding topped with Cool Whip Free.







Veal Country Fried Steak

INGREDIENTS (makes 2 steaks)


2 Veal Cubed Steaks (the grocery store sells them ready-cubed for you)
Sea Salt
freshly Ground Black Pepper
1 cup All-Purpose Flour
1 whole egg, beaten or 1/4 Cup Egg Beater's
Vegetable Oil or Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 cups Low Sodium Beef Broth
1/4 cup 2% Milk
1/2 teaspoon Dried Thyme leaves


DIRECTIONS

Season each piece of veal on both sides with the salt and pepper. Place the flour into a pie pan. Place the egg into a separate pie pan. Dredge the meat on both sides in the flour. Then follow by the egg and finally in the flour again. Repeat with the other piece of veal. Place the meat onto a plate and allow it to sit for 10 to 15 minutes before cooking.

Place enough of the oil to cover the bottom of a 12-inch slope-sided skillet and set over medium-high heat. Once the oil begins to shimmer, add the veal. Cook each piece on both sides until golden brown, approximately 4 to 6 minutes per side.

Remove the steaks to a plate and cover tightly with foil. Set aside.
Remove all but one tablespoon of oil from the pan you cooked the veal in--don't clean the pan because you want all those brown bits. Whisk in one heaping tablespoon of the flour left over from the dredging.

Add the beef broth and deglaze the pan. Whisk until the gravy comes to a boil and begins to thicken, about 3 minutes. Add the milk and thyme and whisk until the gravy coats the back of a spoon, approximately 5 to 10 minutes.

Season to taste, but you probably wont need it. Serve the gravy over the steaks and serve with a side a mashed potatoes.


http://www.armidacooks.com/2006/07/veal-country-fried-steak.html